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Is safety really safe?

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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 903 days ago 2048 views 0 times favorited 86 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2944 posts in 911 days


903 days ago

I grew up in an era where nothing was safe. If you lost a finger or cut yourself, you learned real fast. These days it seems the tools are made with the lowest common denominator in mind. It’s like they expect to sell their tools to people with mental handicaps.
Aside from table saw blade guards, I think most safety attachments are not all that safe at all, or at least they make using the tool a lot harder and thus more unsafe.
I’ll admit it, I don’t use any safety equipment at all. My brain is my safety equipment and my judgement. I’m not saying I haven’t had any accidents, but none of them were preventable by a plastic shield that gets in my way.
My PC router and table had a shield on it that pretty much made the tool useless especially if you were trying to set it up. It was held on with a C clamp and would not get out of the way to get the fence straight. Not to mention that it posed more of a hazard to rout with it on than off.
My biggest fear is that a piece of carbide will fly off my TS and hit me between the eyes, so I lean to one side or the other when cutting. No big deal.
I don’t wear eye protection because I haven’t found a pair of safety glasses I can wear over my prescription glasses with out driving them into my eyeballs.

So what’s your take on all the safety stuff?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


86 replies so far

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 955 days


#1 posted 903 days ago

You should ALWAYS wear safety glasses!

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2944 posts in 911 days


#2 posted 903 days ago

Bob- I wear prescription eye glasses, no set of goggles I’ve ever had work for me with out shoving my glasses into my eye or eyelid, which gets them oily and I can’s see anything then. That’s not safe.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1264 days


#3 posted 903 days ago

If your biggest fear truly is “that a piece of carbide will fly off my TS and hit me between the eyes”, then simply get prescription shatterproof (kevlar, even) safety lenses in your glasses frames. Mine are… and with Flexon7 frames and titanium temples (arms).

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

163 posts in 1314 days


#4 posted 903 days ago

This is a very complex topic but I will only provide a quick response. You cannot blame the manufactures and they don’t have a choice. It is probably a way to try and avoid potential litigation (not always successfully). We live in a era where people strongly argue about personal freedom but the sad reality is that many won’t take personal responsibility for their actions. Should some sort of accident occur then the first thing that they do is to look for someone else to blame and then sue. There are numerous examples, e.g. one idiot trying to drink coffee while driving driving and then getting burned because they spilt hot coffee on themselves. The end result was that this person successfully sued McDonalds so now we have coffee cups that warn us that coffee is hot…..

-- Stuart

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RussellAP

2944 posts in 911 days


#5 posted 903 days ago

Sanity- The world needs more wood workers and less lawyers.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View millzit's profile

millzit

111 posts in 927 days


#6 posted 903 days ago

i think it’s time for a safety meeting….<g>

-- .......now cut that out!

View madts's profile

madts

1245 posts in 964 days


#7 posted 903 days ago

I think that the best safety is shown when you are intimidated by your tools. Once you get complacent with them, that when accidents happen. Safety glasses are a must.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1798 days


#8 posted 903 days ago

When people take the time to learn the facts about the McDonald’s hot coffee case, they stop using it as an example.

Personal responsibility is critical. Luckily, since we now know that corporations are people, THEY have to take responsibility, too.

-- -- Neil

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2104 days


#9 posted 903 days ago

I use the safety equipment provided with the tool with some qualifications. I do think some of the safety attachments are more dangerous than safe. I always use the riving knife on the table saw, but I dont use a blade guard…I dont like not being able to see the line I am cutting. I always use push sticks unless the piece I am cutting is very wide. I always use safety glasses (mine are my glasses with hardened lenses.) I always use hearing protection when using the planer and router or other loud tools. I dont wear hearing protection with the table saw, jointer, drill press etc. My attitude is that accidents (as small as they may be) will eventually happen. How badly you’re hurt, if at all, will depend on what safety devices you are using at the time.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1621 days


#10 posted 903 days ago

This can be a heated topic:
I wear prescription glasses as well. I NEVER wear safety goggles over top of these, it is dangerous, NOT being able to see properly is WORSE than no eye protection at all. I do have prescription safety glasses, because they are made from a plastic type lens, the dust tends to stick to them more, having to clean them more often (which I do).
Some of the “So called safety features on tools also ADD a FALSE sense of protection”
Best protection…......COMMON SENSE.
Some people are just not able to use power tools …........period…...........they need to be told !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

163 posts in 1314 days


#11 posted 903 days ago

Nbeemer I am aware of the fact that many see the hot coffee case as an argument for tort reform and an example of frivolous litigation.

-- Stuart

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1798 days


#12 posted 903 days ago

Okay. So you aren’t aware of the facts.

Kinda’ figured that.

-- -- Neil

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1621 days


#13 posted 903 days ago

Is this the case we are talking about ?
On February 27, 1992, Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman from Albuquerque, New Mexico, ordered a 49-cent cup of coffee from the drive-through window of a local McDonald’s restaurant located at 5001 Gibson Boulevard S.E. Liebeck was in the passenger’s seat of her grandson’s Ford Probe, and her grandson Chris parked the car so that Liebeck could add cream and sugar to her coffee. Liebeck placed the coffee cup between her knees and pulled the far side of the lid toward her to remove it. In the process, she spilled the entire cup of coffee on her lap.[11] Liebeck was wearing cotton sweatpants; they absorbed the coffee and held it against her skin, scalding her thighs, buttocks, and groin.[12] Liebeck was taken to the hospital, where it was determined that she had suffered third-degree burns on six percent of her skin and lesser burns over sixteen percent.[13] She remained in the hospital for eight days while she underwent skin grafting. During this period, Liebeck lost 20 pounds (9 kg, nearly 20% of her body weight), reducing her down to 83 pounds (38 kg).[14] Two years of medical treatment followed.

“Liebeck’s attorneys argued that McDonald’s coffee was “defective”, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. “

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

163 posts in 1314 days


#14 posted 903 days ago

Yep that’s the one. Not sure what facts I am not aware of.

-- Stuart

View lizardhead's profile

lizardhead

517 posts in 1466 days


#15 posted 903 days ago

Russell—I too am an old school tool user-I have learned that much like the samoriyes, samereyes, samurize, Hell them orientals that fight with swords, that you become one with your tool you feel it cut you feel the vibs of the motor you feel the knotholes that you are cutting through, a lot of us today just do not have that knack. I do not use any so called safety crap, it gets in my way and takes away my edge. OSHA and other org’s are trying to protect us against ourselves, and I do not need their protection. I am 65 years old and grew up working with farm tools 36” open face sawblades in your face. Safety glasses my eye!!!! We live in a generation of people that are as smart-even brilliant people, but &^%^$$%# they don’t a lick of good old fashion common sense. you can almost bet that I will be hearing from some of them. Ps. oh I guess I do use a bit of protection—An apron to keep the dust off me a little.

-- Lizardhead---Yeah but it's a dry heat--Tempe, Az

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