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How many teeth for my chop saw blade

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Forum topic by bluekingfisher posted 02-28-2012 08:48 AM 4069 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2445 days


02-28-2012 08:48 AM

I’ve just bought a new 12” Bosch chop saw (still in the mail) before it arrives I want to buy a new blade for it.

How many teeth should I look for on the blade, I belive more is better for finer cuts? is 96 teeth too many? I ask because the one I was looking at stated it was for plastic laminates, non ferrous metals and occasionaly hardwoods??? it is a 5 degree negative rake ATB blade if that is of assistance?

If 96 is too many, would 80 teeth be a better option?

The saw will only be for finer cuts rather than general work as I has a RAS for that task.

Any info on this matter would be appreciated.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan


34 replies so far

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patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#1 posted 02-28-2012 09:06 AM

i like the 80 tooth blade
for that saw
and reverse angle is good
so it doesn’t grab

lucky you !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2445 days


#2 posted 02-28-2012 09:11 AM

Thanks David for the prompt response.

I bought the saw second hand but never actually used so I got a good deal on it, so I figured the saving should be spent on buying a good blade.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1827 days


#3 posted 02-28-2012 12:13 PM

First, check the blade that is on the saw; it may be OK. If you get a new blade, stick with the 80 tooth. The 96 will likely be a slower cut with a tendency to burn.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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Belg1960

966 posts in 2531 days


#4 posted 02-28-2012 12:20 PM

Hey David, really glad you found your saw at a good price. On the one I have I use a 96 tooth one but I don’t have a comparison to an 80 as I have never had anything else but the 96. This blade has served me well over the years, I’ve have only needed to have it sharpened once. Clean cuts in all types of material. Pat

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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kizerpea

774 posts in 1833 days


#5 posted 02-28-2012 01:04 PM

witch ever blade u buy, dont get the thin kerf,,,you will have trouble with the blade flexing an your cuts will be ragged an not straight.thicker blades make better cuts on the miter.

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2445 days


#6 posted 02-28-2012 02:48 PM

Clint, Pat Kiz – Thanks for the come back and the advice fellahs, I actually found a blade with 84T so in a way a compromise between the two.

Pat – Knowing your 96 toother doesn’t cause you burning problems is reassuring, so I’m hoping the 84T blade will provide good results, I’ll keep you posted on that when I get the saw up and running although it may be a week or two yet.

Kiz – It’s not a thin kerf blade, it;s 3.2mm according to the info description, so should be sturdy enough to prevent deflection.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#7 posted 02-28-2012 03:06 PM

If all else is equal, more teeth equates to a cleaner cut, but with a downside of cutting more slowly, having more resistance, and producing more heat. 80T is usually a nice sweet spot depending on what your objectives are. There’s never a free lunch….for every benefit, there’s a downside that most manufacturers won’t mention. There are also many other factors/parameters that are involved with the end performance. Unlike a SCMS or RAS, a very low to negative hook isn’t a necessasity for a straight CMS, but I’d try to stick with a rake of 10° or less. For a 12” blade on a chop saw, I’d definitely stick with full kerf. A Hi-ATB grind will have the lowest amount of tearout, but will dull slightly faster than some other grinds. A standard ATB is a good compromise between lowest tearout and good wear. A triple chip grind TCG) will have the most durable edge, but isn’t as clean cutting in wood fibers as a Hi-ATB or ATB grind…TCG is an excellent choice for tough materials, metals, etc.

You don’t mention the manufacturer of the blade, but I’d be at least as concerned with the overall quality and precision of the blade as the number of teeth. There are so many good blade makers that I’d definitely suggest sticking with a top line from a top manufacturer….Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Forrest, Tenryu, Freud, Amana, CMT, Onsrud, Leitz, and others. Keep it clean, and it’ll perform better for longer.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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longgone

5688 posts in 2774 days


#8 posted 02-28-2012 03:10 PM

Is your saw a chop saw or a slider? The 84 tooth blade should be just fine…especially if you bought a quality blade. There are big differences in quality and you can get a wide variation in cut quality and sharpness longevity.

I have a 10” miter saw with a 64 tooth blade and another blade with 80 teeth. I really don’t see much difference in the cuts and I use it strictly for wood and primarily hardwoods. I never had a problem with any miter saw cuts with a thin kerf blade if they are sharp and I don’t try to rush a cut.

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2445 days


#9 posted 02-28-2012 03:18 PM

knotscott, Greg – thanks for your input fellahs. My saw is a chop saw, I don’t have the room at the rear for a slider, besides I have a RAS which I just use for wider straight cuts.

The blade manufacturer is Trend. They have a good reputation for tooling, mainly routers, cutters and their accessories here in the UK, not sure if they are such a big deal outside the UK.

The blade is an ATB, so as you mentioned knotscott should give a decent cut with longevity between resharpenings?.

If push comes to shove I can always buy the 96 Toother and have it on standby incase I need it for that special project. I think the blade with the saw comes with 48T (counted from the advertisement photograph)

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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waho6o9

7176 posts in 2042 days


#10 posted 02-28-2012 03:22 PM

+1 for the Freud blade. Clean, excellent cuts on hardwood and plywood, haven’t used it on plastics though.

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2445 days


#11 posted 02-28-2012 03:32 PM

Waho – I agree, Freud are great blades, I have a couple for the tablesaw

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#12 posted 02-28-2012 03:52 PM

Admittedly, I haven’t used a Trend blade, but have been comparatively unimpressed with what I’ve seen of their offerings. I guess my question for you is what advantage does the Trend blade offer over one of the more proven names? Price, performance, amount of carbide, none of those? In other words, what’s prompting you to lean towards a Trend blade over a Forrest, Infinity, or Freud?

Check out the size of the carbide and the antivibration/antinoise features:




The Trend looks more like an average $40 blade to me….much more like an Irwin, DeWalt Construction, or Avanti Pro….all less suitable for woodworking than Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Forrest, Tenryu, Freud, Amana, CMT, Onsrud, Leitz, Systimatic, Oshlun, and others.



-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2946 days


#13 posted 02-28-2012 03:54 PM

I like the 80 too.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#14 posted 02-28-2012 04:08 PM

I use 80 tooth also

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2435 days


#15 posted 02-28-2012 04:29 PM

The choice is limited in England. I haven’t even heard of Infinity blades. You would have to search high and low for a Forrest blade... The only place I’ve ever seen them is Rutlands.co.uk – get this, £169.95. YOU ARE HAVING A GIRAFFE!

I’d forget the Forrest and buy a z80 Trend or Dewalt. With the change I’d buy a good quality blade with a lower tooth count in case you are ever cutting teak or oak skirting boards at a 45 deg bevel.
Unless you are examining each cut under an electron microscope, they will do the job well enough.

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