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Changing grinding wheel on bench grinder, preventing vibration

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Forum topic by Brett posted 02-25-2012 03:02 PM 1695 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

621 posts in 1336 days


02-25-2012 03:02 PM

I have an old Black & Decker bench grinder that has seen little use. When I start it up, it runs so smoothly it is hard to tell is is even running (apart from the noise). When I turn it off, it takes almost three minutes for the wheels to stop, and there is almost no vibration at all.

Today, I changed one of the grinding wheels, and now the bench grinder walks all over my workbench. I used a diamond dressing tool, thinking the new wheel was out of round, but I saw no improvement. Are there any “tricks” or techniques to changing grinding wheels that will help ensure smooth operation? Thanks.

-- More tools, fewer machines.


5 replies so far

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

231 posts in 1069 days


#1 posted 02-25-2012 10:33 PM

The wheel itself may be out of balance
The hole in the center may not be concentric with the face
The hole in the center may not be at 90 degrees to the face
The hole in the center may not be the correct size for the grinder
Take the wheel off and run the grinder, if it runs smoothly its the wheel. Take it back and get a better quality or different makers batch number.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11659 posts in 2341 days


#2 posted 02-26-2012 12:32 AM

Yup , I would bring it back as defective , out of balance.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2397 days


#3 posted 02-26-2012 12:48 AM

Sometimes you can loosen the nut on the wheel and turn the wheel on the shaft a 1/4 turn at a time and get it to run true. Because of the slight angle of the nut, it doesn’t tighten down on the wheel squarely. Most wheels must compensate for this. I’ve had good luck using this procedure to get the wheels to run smooth on my grinders.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3451 posts in 2613 days


#4 posted 02-26-2012 12:58 AM

I always “thump” a new wheel to see if I hear a RING or a THUD.
The ‘ring” indicates a solid wheel.
Truing the wheel as you have described should solve a balance issue. Sounds like ya got a bad wheel. Take it back. My Nortons usually respond well to the truing excercise.
DON’T USE A WHEEL THAT IS NOT IN BALANCE. That’s just like havin’ a grenade in the shop with the pin pulled.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11659 posts in 2341 days


#5 posted 02-26-2012 01:09 AM

TT , I’ll try your tip next time I get a “bad” one.
I assumed the cupped washers would eliminate that possible issue. Thanks : )

BW , what do you thump your wheels with ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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