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double double dovetail

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Forum topic by flomp posted 06-01-2008 06:58 PM 10129 views 6 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


06-01-2008 06:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dovetail tip

these joints look amazing and im intreseted in how they are achived. could some one plz explain/describe. thanks


18 replies so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4137 days


#1 posted 06-01-2008 07:01 PM

Just get an Incra router table fence and this:

http://www.incra.com/product_booksplans_master.htm

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#2 posted 06-01-2008 07:05 PM

do you think these could be hand made?

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GaryK

10262 posts in 4137 days


#3 posted 06-01-2008 07:13 PM

Someone here has done it. I don’t remember who though. Do a seach.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#4 posted 06-01-2008 07:30 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/3301

thats one but it dosent show how to do by hand

View Al Navas's profile

Al Navas

305 posts in 4024 days


#5 posted 06-01-2008 07:31 PM

You can also use a dovetail jig, as I did in this one – the Leigh D4: A box with inlaid dovetails, and end-on-end dovetails on the lid. For the lid I did the procedure twice, to get the bow tie effect. You will find this box at the Leigh Inlaid Dovetails Gallery :

You will find the Leigh procedure at their Customer Support page , “How to route inlaid through and half-blind dovetails”.

In addition, I did a 3-part video series on doing inlaid dovetails, which you will find at my blog . It will make a LOT more sense if you view the series in order, starting with Parts 1 & 2, and then viewing The Finale.

-- Al Navas, Country Club, MO, http://sandal-woodsblog.com

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Taigert

593 posts in 3990 days


#6 posted 06-02-2008 11:31 PM

Al,
I Watched your video, good job

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View Doug S.'s profile

Doug S.

295 posts in 3857 days


#7 posted 06-03-2008 12:45 AM

Al
Your’s look great. Most of them I’ve seen look too thick with the contrast wood and sort of gaudy.

-- Use the fence Luke

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Woodhacker

1139 posts in 3872 days


#8 posted 06-03-2008 01:04 AM

Flomp, I’m currently taking pictures on my first actual project using hand cut double dovetails… which you found and referenced above at http://lumberjocks.com/topics/3301. I plan to do a blog on this project, but haven’t started writing it up yet. Technically I guess these aren’t really double double…just double. Perhaps the pictures below will give the idea though…One of the keys to this joint is cutting a rabbet joint on all four sides of the box as you can see in the first picture. The depth of the rabbet equals the width of the “inlay”.

I actually agree with Doug, but since this is my first attempt, I didn’t want to go to thin with the “inlay” portion….doing this by hand makes consistency in the angles of the dovetail and double dovetail very important.

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This is as far as I’ve gotten so far, but as I mentioned above I’m planning on a more detailed blog with explanation, but hopefully these pictures will help. In the meantime let me know if you’d like to discuss it further.

(By the way, Al your boxes look incredible!)

-- Martin, Kansas

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Al Navas

305 posts in 4024 days


#9 posted 06-03-2008 04:17 AM

Ed, Doug, and Martin (Woodhacker):

Thanks! I love making boxes with inlaid dovetails – and challenge myself to make the inlay as thin as I possibly can.

Woodhacker:
I cannot even cut regular dovetails by hand – as a result, I truly admire your work in doing the inlaid variety by hand too!!! THAT is terrific.

-- Al Navas, Country Club, MO, http://sandal-woodsblog.com

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#10 posted 06-04-2008 02:22 PM

thank you al i looked on the link you gave and the inlaid half-blind dovetail joint was incredibly good.

woodhacker this is exactly what i wanted a step by step guide of how to hand make the double dovetails thank you very much and i will follow your blog.

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#11 posted 06-04-2008 02:27 PM

one question wodhacker what woods did you use in your pics above?

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Woodhacker

1139 posts in 3872 days


#12 posted 06-05-2008 02:00 AM

Flomp, the woods used in this box are:

Front/Back (the horizontal longer and darker pieces in the first picture above) honduras rosewood.
First inlay dovetails are birdseye maple, although it’s rather pointless to use birdseye for what ends up being an inlay “strip”...(it’s what I had handy at the time) These pieces are of course “sacrificial”.
The sides are carribean rosewood. I’ve used this wood on a few projects and really love working with it…it’s hard, close grained, and colorful and finishes welll.

Note about the honduras rosewood…I’d not used it before…it is extremely hard and brittle…reminds me a little of gaboon ebony in terms of brittleness. Chopping out the waste from the pins in it was very laborious. I was resharpening and rehoning my chisels every 5 or 6 blows. Frustrating, but finally finished it…I think my chisels have too shallow of a grind angle for this type of wood. It made the maple (which was fairly hard) feel like poplar in comparison. I think it’s going to be beautiful once this wood is finished, but on the next box, I’ll probably pick a hardwood that’s a little easier to work using hand tools.

On the box above, I’ve not decided on the lid yet, but was thinking of some type of mitered frame/panel, possibly with the maple inlay line wrapping across the top (both in front and in back), perhaps even inlay a “dovetail” shape in the top to tie it all together from a design perspective.

Good luck with yours…let me know how it goes.

-- Martin, Kansas

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#13 posted 06-05-2008 02:29 PM

thank you for the info
once i start my project i will post it up.

i am looking for two woods which are contrasting , durable and easy to usedo u have any suggestions

View Woodhacker's profile

Woodhacker

1139 posts in 3872 days


#14 posted 06-06-2008 06:07 AM

My preference is always hardwoods, but some are harder to work with than others. To me a walnut and maple are always good contrasts. Of course using three woods would not be necessary as I’m doing in the project above. Cherry is an excellent wood for use with machine or hand tools, but the contrast between it and either walnut or maple will be more subtle, and remember that cherry will darken quicker than walnut over time. So a walnut/cherry contrast diminshes over time. Cherry/maple might be good. Cherry is also softer, and close-grained compared to walnut.

Mahogany would also be a good hardwood that’s not too hard and easier to work with hand tools than either of the rosewoods I’m using on this box. I think mahogany and maple would also be a nice combination. Everyone’s perceptions are different, but I’ve used jatoba (brazilian cherry) on boxes and as a fairly hard hard, dense wood, I like the way it works with hand tools too…it’s about the color of mahogany…lighter than walnut, and both darker and harder than cherry.

I’m sure we could come up tons of other combinations too.

Flomp, regardless of your woodworking experience with hand tools and dovetails, I would recommend making some practice double dovetail joints (as shown in my first picture above) before trying it for real. I found I learned a lot by doing this, and even though it took more time. it made these much more satisfying.

(note about the project above…since the last picture above, I’ve done final fitting on the joints and am hoping to get time this weekend to cut a tongue and grooved hickory base to be set in place as I glue up the sides. Then I’ll begin on the lid’s design/contruction.)

-- Martin, Kansas

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flomp

25 posts in 3797 days


#15 posted 06-06-2008 11:25 AM

thank you very much for your replies woodhacker you have been incredibly helpful.
Cherry/maple mahogany/maple look to be the best options.

i have practised some normal dovetails and they were quite sucsessful and i agree practice does realy improve technique and i will do at least 3 practice double dovetail joints. i think it will definatly be a hard challenge and ill see how it goes.

thanks

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