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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 02-23-2012 12:50 AM 1751 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1752 days


02-23-2012 12:50 AM

I love oiled woods. I’d like to know what you all use to oil your wood and which oil is best for what wood. I have some boiled linseed oil, but I haven’t seen anything else that I could try. Any idea’s?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


22 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1827 days


#1 posted 02-23-2012 12:59 AM

Throw out the BLO; it’s only good for starting fires. The only straight oil worth considering is raw tung oil, but it’s a slow cure. Processed tung oil like WaterLox is a good second choice. An alternative is a wipe-on blend of oil poly thinned with naptha.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#2 posted 02-23-2012 01:55 AM

I love BLO. I use it constanly. Check out tung oil, and danish oil as well. I use danish oil when I want to darken or stain. I have several walnut and dark walnut danish oils. I will typically coat with BLO after. You can also then coat with wipe on poly or other finishes.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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ShaneA

6474 posts in 2064 days


#3 posted 02-23-2012 02:00 AM

I like pure tung oil and mineral spirits 50/50 mix.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#4 posted 02-23-2012 02:46 AM

I too love BLO and use it a lot. I prefer diluting it 2 parts BLO to 1 part mineral spirits. I then typically apply 3 coats rubbing each until cloth is basically dry. Check out my projects if you want to see what various woods look like finished with BLO.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Nate_AM's profile

Nate_AM

16 posts in 1752 days


#5 posted 02-23-2012 02:57 AM

Clint, how long does your tung oil take to harden? Do you thin it?

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#6 posted 02-23-2012 02:59 AM

Sorry guys
I guess I’m the loner here because I hate BLO
I feel it’s and old fashion finish that takes for every to dry and offers little protection .
I would suggest ArmRSeal a very durable great looking oil finish that dries in a short time, and looks great.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2007259/10160/Satin-ArmRSeal-Pint.aspx

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1752 days


#7 posted 02-23-2012 03:00 AM

I’m open to almost anything but stain. I like to experiment.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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newwoodbutcher

552 posts in 2316 days


#8 posted 02-23-2012 03:37 AM

I’ve had great success with Liberon Furniture Oil. It’s a bit pricey but wow what a finish you can rub on with it, from a high gloss top coat to an oil rubbed satin depending on how you work with it.

-- Ken

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#9 posted 02-23-2012 03:52 PM

I hate to disagree with Clint and a1Jim but I’m going to. If you apply BLO like I do it won’t take forever to dry: I never flood the surface and wait to wipe the excess off as the can recommends. Rather I apply it with a SMALL scrap of t shirt and rub until it feels almost dry. It doesn’t take much BLO to do a project. I then repeat this for a total of 3 coats applied over 2 days. If you hate the smell, a light coat of shellac will eliminate it. As far as protection, I agree with them BUT I did the floor of my office with BLO 3 years ago because we couldn’t close the office while urethane dried/cured. We applied two coats as described on a Sat and Sun and the office was open on Monday with the Blo dry. We really like it because if an area gets scuffed we just rub some BLO on and good to go. This floor is reclaimed doug fir from my dad’s barn so not a high gloss formal finish but it looks great in the clinic office and we get a lot of favorable comments on it. Sorry this was so long but I LOVE BLO and consider it an ‘idiot proof’ finish (probably why I like it). I think people should try it and decide whether it fits their situation. Respectfully submitted, gfadvm (Andy)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Danpaddles

554 posts in 1777 days


#10 posted 02-23-2012 03:57 PM

Watco for me. I use Waterlox some, after the first coat, it drys faster than Watco. I do not have a dedicated finish area, work stops in my shop when I am doing finish work. So a fast dry is worthwhile to me.

then, was whatever you just finished coating. Makes a world of difference!

I used the Same Maloof system on a chest a couple years back, that is a good quality product, not too hard to get friendly with. But I like my Watco.

-- Dan V. in Indy

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#11 posted 02-23-2012 04:04 PM

I’m going to have to agree with gfadvm. Applied correctly blo is great. Touch up if needed is wipe some on. Blending it is a no brained. Its not perfect for all exterior use, but if you find a better finish for shovel handles, axe handles and that kind of stuff, let me know.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2357 posts in 2462 days


#12 posted 02-23-2012 04:06 PM

Watco for me . Does take a little longer to dry, but the finish seems worth it.
You can get clear, or stained, I prefer a DARK walnut stain on most of my projects (personal taste)
It is becoming harder to find here.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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KnickKnack

1062 posts in 3032 days


#13 posted 02-23-2012 04:47 PM

I like all the oils – BLO, tung, “oil for teak”, “cedar oil”.
Rather than thin, I heat my oil in a small solar heater (sounds posh – glass bottle of oil in a plastic bottle in the sun) – since I’ve been doing this it seems to penetrate more, cure faster and I get a better finish.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1752 days


#14 posted 02-23-2012 05:19 PM

Thanks for all the input guys. I guess I’ll keep an open mind and try them all.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1827 days


#15 posted 02-23-2012 05:32 PM

Nate—-A rubbed in light coat of raw tung oil will take about a week to cure to the point of recoating. Thinning with naptha seems to speed up the cure by a couple days. Waterlox, actually a varnish, which is a mixture of processed tung oil, resin, driers, and mostly solvent, will cure to recoat stage in a day. It’s expensive, and whatever is left over will rapidly gel in the can.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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