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table top warp

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Forum topic by Matt posted 02-20-2012 04:15 AM 1286 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt

5 posts in 1755 days


02-20-2012 04:15 AM

I am new to LJ and have only a couple years woodworking experience. I have learned a lot about using the right tools, but I still have a lot to learn about the right wood. I have recently built a farm table for a dining room
and the top has warped or cupped slightly. I used reclaimed long leaf pine 2×6 material that was recovered from an old factory floor. As I have been reading about how a balance in moisture content on both sides is necessary for a flat top I realized that I have made some mistakes. I planed one side of the wood and left the other for only a light sanding.
The bottom obviously absorbed more moisture because I planed it clean. It has been stained and sealed with Watco, but I am wondering if there is anything else I can do, before I attach the top to the base (probably with turn-buttons or metal fasteners)


4 replies so far

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3155 days


#1 posted 02-20-2012 05:09 AM

Yup , I have always been told that you must take the same amount of wood off of both faces to help prevent warping and equalize the humidity / moisture content. The freshly exposed planed side is giving up and or taking in moisture more easily than the barely sanded side will. Did you acclimate the Pine to your shop before starting to work on it ? What was the moisture content before and after ? You may have to start over and plane the sanded side equally with the first side , allow time to acclimate and then refinish.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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Matt

5 posts in 1755 days


#2 posted 02-20-2012 01:18 PM

I didn’t want to plane the top size because it had such a great reclaimed texture saw marks and scratches and such.
I sanded it pretty good with a belt sander, but planing it wood defeat the whole purpose of looking reclaimed.
I did let them sit in the shop a couple days, but it is not very air tight. They might as well have been outside. No heat or A/C. It is not a bad warp, probably 1/4 from side to side (40” width). I’ll probably install some battens and leaves some grooves for the screws to move with expansion.

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Matt

5 posts in 1755 days


#3 posted 02-20-2012 01:30 PM

Is it possible to dry the side that accepted more moisture somehow? Let the convex side acclimate indoors and dry it with a heat gun. There isn’t much sun around here in February otherwise it would stick it outside the the Texas sun. Both sides of my table top have 2 coats of stain and one coat of TEAK oil. I plan on finishing with wax.

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3155 days


#4 posted 02-20-2012 04:00 PM

Two days isn’t really enough time to acclimate. A tip I learned by watching Tommy Mac , is to rough size your stock and then re-sticker it to let the the freshly exposed grain acclimate.Then mill it to finished sizes from there.
I really don’t know what to tell you seeing that you’ve already applied stain and oil to yours.
Seeing as you’re going for the reclaimed look , I don’t think your warping issue is all that critical : )
It’s called character !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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