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Rikon 12 inch Bandsaw?

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Forum topic by mitcheta posted 02-19-2012 02:26 AM 9205 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mitcheta

3 posts in 2257 days


02-19-2012 02:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: rikon bandsaw 10-315

I’m in the market for a bandsaw, but given space constraints am considering the Rikon 10-315, which is a 12 inch model. I have seen no reviews on this saw.
- Anyone have one?
- I’ve only got a 6 inch jointer, so thinking that 7.5 inch resaw capacity would be all I could use anyway. Opinions?
- Anyone know where it is actually made? Same at the 12 inch craftsman?
- Are 12 inch blades hard to come by, even via mail order?

Thanks!
-Tom


8 replies so far

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HorizontalMike

7143 posts in 2373 days


#1 posted 02-19-2012 02:51 AM

Hi Tom,
I bought the Rikon 10-325 14in Deluxe and while I was dreaming big, I never knew if I was ever going to need all that 13in of resaw capacity. In two years of ownership, the largest 8/4 hardwood that I have resawed is ~9in and yes I have an 8in jointer. That does seem to match the two,... BS to jointer ratio if you will.

However, I think the bigger question to ask yourself is just how large of 8/4 stock are you willing to wrestle with? IMO, the larger resaw capacity of the 14in 10-325 allows you to be a bit more flexible when visiting the lumberyard. And for the price difference between the 12in and the 14in models, I think I would have still bought the 14in model. There are those who will argue that the larger the wheel the better, because of blade flexure being reduced. I have seen WC put the 14in on sale at $799 recently so that can really put the larger model in your $$$ range.

Just my 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#2 posted 02-19-2012 03:10 AM

Get the biggest band saw that will fit in your shop and budget Tom. You shouldn’t have trouble obtaining blades for either machine.

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#3 posted 02-19-2012 04:51 AM

I don’t recommend fixating on resaw capacity. More relevant
imo is blade width capacity. Wider blades resist the deflection
that ruins resaw and other deep cuts.

Large resaw capacity is relevant to some craftspeople, luthiers
and turners in particular. For furniture it is over-rated because
you’ll get wild cupping resawing anything less that quartered
lumber in a width much over 6”.

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#4 posted 02-19-2012 02:00 PM

AFAIK, both the Rikon and the Craftsman 22400 are made in China by Richen Enterprises (who owns Rikon). The two saws aren’t identical, but they’re pretty similar and do share many parts. The Rikon has a larger motor.

I’ve got the 22400, and it’s been a pretty good tool. It’s fairly powerful, heavy and stable, but 3/4hp is not the same as 1-1/2 or 2hp. With the right blade, it will resaw to full blade height if you give it time. My TS will resaw to 6+ inches, so if I’m in a hurry I’ll use the TS instead. My biggest beef is that the tensioning knob is a pain….I’d always planned to replace it with something that’s a larger diameter and has a handle. Once in a while I wish it were bigger. If the price is right, I’d recommend it, but I’d also be considering a good 14”.

Custom length blades are plentiful and affordable on the web. I paid around $50 for 4 Timberwolf blades from Suffolk Machinery about 5 years ago. Lennox, Woodslicer, Olsen, and others are also popular.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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HorizontalMike

7143 posts in 2373 days


#5 posted 02-19-2012 03:56 PM

Wider blades, as Loren points out are better at ripping. My 14in can handle 3/4in width and the TimberWolf 3/4in 3TPI blade makes short work of the ripping chores I have thrown at it. The 12in model also states it can handle up to 3/4in blades. I have seen on here that some argue that smaller wheels are harder on these wide blades (by causing more bending) than larger wheels. I do not know haw much of that is the “Tim Allen ToolMan’ talking and how much of that is practical facts. The criticism I read was talking about the 14in being ‘too small’ for 3/4in and larger blades, FWIW. One of the complaints claimed 3/4in blades could not be tensioned tight enough to be useful on 14in and smaller machines. I have NOT found that to be the case on my 10-325 BS.

As knotscott points out, that extra horsepower comes in handy in the long run. 12in = 1hp, 14in = 1 1/2hp. And the quick release tensioner on both Rikon models is a god send and very easy to use.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#6 posted 02-19-2012 04:16 PM

A welded steel-frame saw can take more tension in general
than the cast iron-frame saws. That said, it’s lightweight
parts in the tension adjustment thinner and shorter wheel
shafts and inferior bearings in smaller saws that may be
worn out or busted by cranking up the tension to run wider
blades.

There are some much heavier duty smaller saws made which
can take a great deal of tension, like the Hitachi resaw machines.

Oh – and Sears will probably carry blades for both the 12” and 14”
Rikon.

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#7 posted 02-19-2012 04:54 PM

Loren’s comments about bearings reminded me that the stock guide bearings on the 22400 were junk. I replaced them with better ABEC 5 roller blade bearings….~ $10-$12, and 15 minutes. Not sure if the Rikon guides are the same.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View mitcheta's profile

mitcheta

3 posts in 2257 days


#8 posted 03-04-2012 03:26 AM

Thanks all for the advice. I ended up getting a used JET jwbs-14cs. Does not have a riser but can always add later. I’ll check out the timberwolf blades next.

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