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The new Kreg Rip-Cut

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Forum topic by Jonathan posted 794 days ago 6073 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jonathan

2603 posts in 1552 days


794 days ago

This was just introduced today. Any thoughts on the new Kreg Rip-Cut?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."


25 replies so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

14592 posts in 1368 days


#1 posted 794 days ago

I usually use a strait edge and clamps but this does look like it might have some possibilities. Thanks for posting.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1471 days


#2 posted 794 days ago

“Wow, maybe I can make those shelves after all! Thank you Kreg Jig!!”

that’s one of the comments posted on that page. So funny.

erm, its basically an extended and beefed up rip fence for a circular saw, like everything it will have its limitations and won’t be as versatile as a track saw. Some people will buy it, use it once, toss it in a drawer and say its crap, others will say it’s the best thing since bread came sliced, “why pay $600 for Festool TS55 when this is just as good…” type thing.

My own concerns would have to do with starting the cut and I can’t see how the two fixing screws would keep a good hold on a circular saw.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15544 posts in 2720 days


#3 posted 794 days ago

I could be wrong, but intuition tells me this would be good for fairly narrow rips, but the farther away the saw is from the edge guide, the easier it will be for the blade to go off course.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

14592 posts in 1368 days


#4 posted 794 days ago

I have a small shop and what I would do with this is bust up a piece of plywood outside on the four identical saw horses that I have and then bring them in and finish cut on my table saw. In my shop it is nearly impossible to cut a full sheet of plywood and also dangerous. A good strait edge and clamps work fine for this but this could be quicker. It all depends on it’s cost.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

1904 posts in 987 days


#5 posted 794 days ago

Seems like a decent tool if you have to break down sheet goods with any regularity. The price is reasonable so it’s not in the “handy but overly expensive gimmick” tool category. It’s also a lot cheaper than a panel saw station with the tracking grids. There’s also safety to consider. Table saws don’t like cutting huge sheets and kickback is a huge danger.

All in all, not a bad idea. I might have to pick up one up.

-- Brian in Arlington, TX

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1697 days


#6 posted 794 days ago

I still like using straight edge guides like below;

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=22083&filter=Straight%20edge%20guide

Caught this set of 24”, 36”,and50” on sale at Houston store for $59.99 a few weeks ago and already have same brand that will clamp on over 100” so it covers full plywood sheets and longer, wider MDF sheets.

Kreg makes really good tools but, think this one will be hard to keep the guide parallel to edge on wide cuts. And, as pointed out in comments on Kreg site, you cannot crosscut a full sheet into two 48”x48”pieces.

My two cents worth.

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View Loren's profile

Loren

6760 posts in 2149 days


#7 posted 794 days ago

Not much different from the Accu-Rip sold by Sears.

Plywood edges aren’t straight. When you rip parallel
to factory edges you get bowed cuts. The long guides like
the Festool and many other brands establish a more
accurate reference edge.

View startreking's profile

startreking

36 posts in 800 days


#8 posted 794 days ago

It looks like Festool is getting some heavy competition in the guided saws arena.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4521 posts in 1576 days


#9 posted 794 days ago

I see nothing here that I cannot do better with my Festool plunge saw and track.

I know people like to get on Festool for being too expensive. Note that their plunge saw and track does not cost much more (if any more) than compatible products by DeWalt of Makita and Festools dust/chip capturing capability is second to none if used with their dust extractor.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1697 days


#10 posted 794 days ago

Jonathan;

No matter how I cut down large panels, I have support under both sides of the cut for safety and control.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/29870

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View redhush's profile

redhush

1 post in 825 days


#11 posted 794 days ago

Loren makes the best point. Never trust a factory edge. And, if you need to take it to the saw afterwards anyway, I’ll stick with my straightedge and clamps. Not worth it If it costs more than $20

-- Thought is a bird of space, who, in a cage of words, can spread it's wings but cannot fly

View agallant's profile

agallant

425 posts in 1388 days


#12 posted 794 days ago

So the fault I see with this is that if the edge is not straight than you are going to replicate any defects in your cut.

View Loren's profile

Loren

6760 posts in 2149 days


#13 posted 794 days ago

Oh, edge guides are fine for ripping up sheathing for
floors and stuff like that. You can also snap a chalk line
and do it by eye. The chalk line cut may be rougher
than the edge guided cut but the chalk line is reliably
straighter.

View stefang's profile

stefang

11820 posts in 1836 days


#14 posted 794 days ago

It looks like it would easily veer off course with just a little sideways pressure. I think it is easy to make a guide that you know will work. I like the Festool solution, but I would only buy it if I were a pro or if I cut lots and lots platter.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1229 posts in 1127 days


#15 posted 794 days ago

I was looking forward to this but after seeing it I have to say NO! This doesn’t look like a well thought out design at all. I’ll stick with my straight edge clamps. Better luck next Kreg

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

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