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Do I need a spokeshave? Something else?

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Forum topic by Lumber2Sawdust posted 02-13-2012 02:14 AM 1019 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lumber2Sawdust

136 posts in 1553 days


02-13-2012 02:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut slab coffee table

I’m working on a walnut slab for a coffee table. I have been working on refining the overall shape of it this weekend. The live edge flares out from the bottom side of the slab toward the top. I trimmed one section of the edge today where 2 branches came out of this piece and I want to shape the edge that I cut to help it blend into the natural edge around it. Here are a couple of photos of what I’m working on. Both photos show the bottom side of the slab.

The area along the bottom of this photo is what is cut that I am working on

Another angle

I used a block plane to do some shaping on the convex areas. It was a little awkward, but it got the job done. The bigger challenge is getting into the concave curves. The plane won’t get into those areas. I have a decent assortment of chisels, but I don’t think they would help for more then just hacking some chunks out of the area to rough out the area.

It got me thinking that maybe a spokeshave would be useful for something like this. I’m sure it wouldn’t get into some of the tighter curves, but could do a lot on both the convex and concave areas. What do you think, is a spokeshave a good tool for something like this? What would you use instead?

If a spokeshave is a good fit, what do you like? I’m considering LN, or LV, possibly something else if it is not made in Asia.


4 replies so far

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superstretch

1504 posts in 1381 days


#1 posted 02-13-2012 04:18 AM

Perhaps a curved card scraper? It might not remove material quickly, but the round profile would get into the concave parts well.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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gfadvm

11234 posts in 1378 days


#2 posted 02-13-2012 04:23 AM

If you are just trying to clean it up a wire brush in a die grinder works well ( and will even sculpt/remove a good bit of wood if you lean on it. It follows the contours well and won’t gouge out chunks. Use a full face shield if you do this cause it may fling some wire frags! You can get wire wheels in many different grades from very soft to very stiff and aggressive. I use these for all my live edge projects and really like them. I have used both air and electric die grinders and the electric seems more aggressive and a little less user friendly.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Lumber2Sawdust

136 posts in 1553 days


#3 posted 02-13-2012 04:29 AM

Thanks for the replies guys.

In the second photo in my post, I want to remove more material from the slab at the top. I will probably remove 1/2” or more, tapering that to where it meets the top surface.

I expect that a curved scraper will be perfect for getting into the tighter sections. Would a wire wheel be able to remove that much material?

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gfadvm

11234 posts in 1378 days


#4 posted 02-13-2012 04:52 AM

One of those coarse/twisted (‘knotted’) wire wheels will remove a lot of wood fast in a die grinder. Go with the grain and expect to sand unless you like the textured look (I personally like that look). Try it on some scrap, I think you’ll like it but remember the serious eye and face protection!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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