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Cutting box sides on a table saw, drift...

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Forum topic by SuburbanDon posted 02-09-2012 05:33 PM 2612 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuburbanDon

487 posts in 2458 days


02-09-2012 05:33 PM

My limited experience with cutting mitered joints on a table saw, (ie 4 sides for a box) has been pretty bad. if I use a feather board to hold the board down, should I expect the wood to stay against the fence or, what is the trick ? padded pushers that I use on my jointer ? There is not much wood to work with in the first place unless I work a larger piece and cut off what I need.

Any ideas ?

Thanks. Don

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---


8 replies so far

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3683 days


#1 posted 02-09-2012 05:38 PM

Are you talking about crosscutting with the blade at a 45 degree angle, or cutting with the board on edge using a miter gauge?

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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SuburbanDon

487 posts in 2458 days


#2 posted 02-09-2012 06:45 PM

Sorry I wasn’t clear. I meant table saw at 45 deg. It always seems the board wants to lift up off the blade.

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3683 days


#3 posted 02-09-2012 07:18 PM

I’ve never tried it, just because it always seemed to me like an inherently inaccurate method, and the idea of that cutoff under a tilted blade scares me a bit. But I could be totally wrong. Hopefully, someone will chime in with some good advice.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Loren

8307 posts in 3112 days


#4 posted 02-09-2012 08:56 PM

You can cut on the other side of the blade or get some
“Board Buddies” or similar ripping hold-down. Grip-tite
featherboards have both a hold-down and a hold-in.

If cutting the bevels in the “trapped” position, re-align
he fence so it is just slightly off parallel and “opens”
1/64th inch of so from front to back of the fence. You
can also use an auxiliary fence set up European style,
which is to say not protruding much past the start
of the cut.

View buckles's profile

buckles

24 posts in 2006 days


#5 posted 02-10-2012 02:36 AM

Don
I am an old man with arthritic fingers. I like to make tissue boxes with 1/8” mitered sides and top edges.

I use a crosscut sled to cut the pieces. This is my third generation crosscut sled.

It has solid Walnut plywood for the base. I built it with 9 plys laminated to 3/4” thick so it should never warp or twist.
It has T Slots for hold down clamps. an aluminum stop block and measuring tapes. It has scribe lines cut into the base for 22 1/2; 30 45; 60; and 67 1/2* for mitered picture frame ends.

I have donkeys ear built that I use to cut the bevels on the edge of the 1/8” box sides.

The edges come out of the saw ready to fit and glue. No sanding required. They are so sharp they will cut your finger.
With a rip guide held down in the T Slots you can cut very thin strips accurately, quickly and safely.

I made one of these for a friend of mine after he offered me $125 for it. After material costs I made less than $2 an hour.
Build on for yourself, they make the difference between Mediocrity and fine work.
Regards
Joe

-- Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed for the same reasons.

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SuburbanDon

487 posts in 2458 days


#6 posted 02-10-2012 04:05 AM

Joe thanks for the response. I like your taste in jig wood !

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#7 posted 02-10-2012 04:37 AM

I use my miter gauge as trapping the workpiece between the blade and fence is VERY dangerous. As far as holding the workpiece down, Clamp a board to your auxillary miter fence on top of the piece you are cutting to act as a Featherboard/holddown. I agree with the sharp blade comment and would recommend that you raise your blade to where the bottom of the gullets are just above the piece to be cut. Hope this is helpful. Let me know if you need pics or more info.Edit: a strip of sandpaper on the front of your auxillary miter fence also help keep the workpiece from ‘creeping’.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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SuburbanDon

487 posts in 2458 days


#8 posted 02-10-2012 02:23 PM

Ok thanks for the advice. I’m not a fan of trapping the piece between the blade and table. I fear and respect my table saw. Also I guess practice on flat scrap wood would be a good idea.

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

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