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Re-drilling Hub Center

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Forum topic by Absinthe posted 02-09-2012 11:14 AM 2251 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


02-09-2012 11:14 AM

I have recently rebuilt a spinning wheel. The poor thing had been badly taken care of, and left completely unfinished for at least 15 years.

The main wheel is spoked with a round center hub. The hub was a lamination that was (at one time) glued together and drilled for the spokes. Well, I realigned and re-glued the hub.

When I put the center axle through it, I though I was home free. However, it would appear that the hole is now off center to a few degrees, so my wheel now wobbles.

I have considered gluing a dowel into the existing hole and re-drilling a square and center hole. I can’t do it on my drill press, because it is not deep enough to get to the center of the wheel. I do have a hand-held drill guide which might work. But I am still considering any other options/suggestions.

Any ideas?

-- Absinthe


14 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7143 posts in 2375 days


#1 posted 02-09-2012 01:47 PM

Why not use a long piece of hardwood to span the wheels entire diameter, and then drill a guide hole in a piece of 8/4 hardwood as a guide for your hand drill. This is how I drilled the 3/4in dog holes in my workbench since all I had was an 8in drill press.

http://www.horizontalheavens.com/GarageWorkshop/Projects/21stCenturyWorkBench/MakingDogHoleTemplate.jpg

http://www.horizontalheavens.com/GarageWorkshop/Projects/21stCenturyWorkBench/UsingDogHoleTemplate.jpg

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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489tad

3098 posts in 2472 days


#2 posted 02-09-2012 01:53 PM

I would plug the hole and redrill. Make a guide that locates on the center of the hub. the guide itself, make it long enough to hold the drill bit so its square to the hub. If possible drill from both sides of the hub. Hope this helps.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

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Ben

302 posts in 1791 days


#3 posted 02-09-2012 02:04 PM

If it is an antique, I wouldn’t do the dowel thing. I would take my time with the round side of a file and ream it little by little until the wobble is gone. I work with antiques and anything added to it could detract from the value. If that isn’t a concern, doweling it would probably be the easiest fix. Mikes idea for a guide would seem better to me than a store bought drill guide IMO. I never trust mine unless it is the only workable option

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#4 posted 02-09-2012 02:39 PM

As for antique, this particular model was made up until 1997. I am not sure if 15 years constitutes an antique in spinning wheels, but it is what it is. I have completely disassembled it, sanded it clean, stained and put on 3 coats of polyurethane. If it had any antique value at all, I suspect that I have removed it along with the abused patina or an item which was sold unfinished with the intent that the end user was going to oil/was it and assemble it him/herself (such that said user never performed such prophylactic action)

On the other hand, it seems that it is a simple (rather than compound) wobble. I could certainly try to use the rat tail to enlarge the hub hole until it is “unwobbled”. How, then would I best back fill the resulting elliptical hole?

These should show the degree of wobble:

Here is the pretty version:

-- Absinthe

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2311 days


#5 posted 02-09-2012 03:43 PM

We tend to go right to dowel when we want to put wood in a hole. I’d suggest you plug it with flat grain wood, which will make your drilling easier.

Is it possible to go up a step in axle diameter, so once you drill it, you’re in common material?

Looks like that is a pretty nifty crank shape, so probably not. What about a metal bushing, which would fit into a larger hole. Perhaps the axle could be superglued in place, or is it pinned in some way?

Interesting challenge. Thanks for bringing it to us.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#6 posted 02-09-2012 03:47 PM

It is pinned with a roll pin that is cradled in a groove on the back side of the hub.

I considered the sleeve as well. I am not sure what I am looking for or that would have such a beast at Lowes.

-- Absinthe

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#7 posted 02-09-2012 03:59 PM

You can see the hub split in two pieces in the upper left hand corner of this picture done when I was doing the refinishing:

-- Absinthe

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Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#8 posted 02-09-2012 04:15 PM

I’m a spinner. Out of curiosity, is there a maker/company name anywhere on it? I don’t recognize it from the photo, but there are many different makers out there now.

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#9 posted 02-09-2012 05:30 PM

It is an Ashford Scholar Mark II. This is the model that was replaced by the Kiwi in about 1997.

I also have a Joy, but I bought that used from my neighbor and it is in pristine condition. I am not taking that one apart :)

Here are some of my yarns:

and my first attempt at knitting from my own hand spun:

-- Absinthe

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Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#10 posted 02-09-2012 05:38 PM

I love the variegated blue!!

My wheel is a Kromski Sonata (the folding one) but I haven’t done any spinning in ages. Need to get back into it! I have half-designed plans to build a squirrel cage yarn swift but got stuck at the ‘needed hardware’ stage and set it aside for now.

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#11 posted 02-09-2012 05:53 PM

That is a merino that my neighbor hates. it is from a commercial bat that is so tight that it is really tough to spin. Some of those yarns are actually spun on a hand spindle.

The Kromski Sonata is a pretty wheel. Both of mine are travelers (sort of) the Joy specifically, and the Scholar, the tredle folds up.

I have some plans to build my own wheel, or several. I am in the process of a drum carder, that, is waiting for me to finish the shop cabinetry before I get back to it.

Re-balancing this wheel is going to be a good exercise, I think. Hopefully I can get it without too much ridiculousness.

-- Absinthe

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#12 posted 02-10-2012 02:15 PM

Bought a dowel today and a couple sleeve bushings, just in case. Hopefully, this weekend I will have it working.

-- Absinthe

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#13 posted 02-12-2012 12:06 AM

So far, I have tried 2 different attempts, and both failed miserably. I am not 100% certain that my drill guide works perfectly, but I am not sure how to prove that. At any rate, I will now try drilling a hole with the drill press and using that as a guide. In addition to that, I will elevate it so that it is square to the surface of the wheel rather than the hub, since I am slightly concerned that the hub itself may not be in perfect plane with the wheel surface.

I am still open to other solutions. This should not have been this difficult. :(

-- Absinthe

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1992 days


#14 posted 02-13-2012 01:31 AM

Ok, I got it, close enough. It is back together and functional, I did about 60 yards of very coarse wool.

Here’s a closeup of the wool

-- Absinthe

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