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Home-Built Chute Plane, way kool!! ...Wrap- Up

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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 901 days ago 3069 views 7 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

3559 posts in 2336 days


901 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: jig chute board shoot board transitional plane home-made

Okay… A hand-operated alternative to jointers is getting higher on the list of priorities in the Poopiekat workshop. However, since I have failed so far to master the ability to achieve perfect 90-degree edges on my stock by hand, here’s what I decided to do: Photobucket This is a plane I built from spare parts, adapted for use in a to-be-built chute board. I have a stockpile of junky transitional planes that will never get refurbished in my lifetime. So I stole a National cast iron bed, a Union frog and other bits and pieces and put them together in a wooden body I made of beech, oak and maple. wow, this reconstituted plane is a real hot-rod! It cuts nicely. Voila! a VERY stable sideways mounted plane! Perfect 90-degree edges are virtually assured this way. Photobucket This creation will be used to make vertical edge surfacing on lumber mounted in the chute fixture. Photobucket This is a mock-up of the yet-to-be-built chute board, with which I want to incorporate De-sta-co clamps so that all final dimensioning can be achieved in the chute board itself. Photobucket I want to be able to not only square my stock for future projects on this rig, but also to dimension and surface all edges. Mostly, I want to further reduce my dependence on table saws and jointer, relying only on bandsaw and handsaws for preliminary sizing, and final dimensioning on this fixture. What do you think of this? Constructive ideas for a final chute board are appreciated, especially if you have already built a unit similar to the mock-up in the above photos. Thanks for looking!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


29 replies so far

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2857 posts in 1089 days


#1 posted 901 days ago

I have no constructive criticism, all I have is a large amount of awe and wonderment.

I really need to build something like this if my skills ever get that good.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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poopiekat

3559 posts in 2336 days


#2 posted 901 days ago

Thanks, Dallas! Sometimes, it’s the desire to do better work that provides the incentive to make a tool that brings our craft up a notch or two. I was never able to freehand a perfect 90 degree edge on a board in the bench vise, and it was frustrating to me to not be able to cultivate that talent. With this setup, a square edge is expected every time.
I want to put self-stick rulers on the chute board so that I can position and clamp the boards down and plane them to their exact final dimensions.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Don W's profile

Don W

14651 posts in 1169 days


#3 posted 901 days ago

my first thought….why didn’t i think of that.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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saddletramp

994 posts in 1240 days


#4 posted 901 days ago

Poopie, it’s plane and simple, you’re a chuting star! ;^))

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

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Mauricio

6749 posts in 1753 days


#5 posted 901 days ago

Cool idea, cant wait to see the finished product. I’m adding you to my buddy list so Im sure not to miss it.

What about using T tracks with clamps ride in it so you can adjust them to different size stock?

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brit's profile

Brit

5107 posts in 1444 days


#6 posted 901 days ago

Great idea Poopie! Have you thought of incorporating a variable angle ramp to run the plane along? If you hinged it at the far end, you could move a chock along underneath the ramp to vary the angle accoding to the thickness of the stock you need to plane. You will then ensure that you use all of the cutting edge on the blade and gravity will assist your forward movement.

Just a thought.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

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poopiekat

3559 posts in 2336 days


#7 posted 901 days ago

Thanks, Mauricio and Brit! Yes, it seems whenever I have a moment at work to pull out my sketchpad, ideas seem to appear out of nowhere! Home, at my liesure, not so much. Heh I made graph paper at work using a set-up blank Excel worksheet, and under pressure at work is when I am at my most creative. Thanks, Brit, for the inclined runway idea! You know, this whole concept was fostered by the fact that your average #4 or #5 Stanley plane has but maybe 1/8” to 3/16” of neutral bearing surface beside the cutter to guide a plane on a chute board, so dammit I gave myself a full 1/2” inch of bearing surface by adding a fat side to the wooden plane body. So.. no rollover accidents here! I’m already thinking of ways to make beveled and/or tapered edges with this rig, my head’s gonna explode. I’ve got T-slots and stuff, hmm maybe I’ll use up some of that 80/20 aluminum stock, which means breaking up and scavenging some of my other contraptions. Rock on, folks!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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poopiekat

3559 posts in 2336 days


#8 posted 901 days ago

Oh, yeah, one other thing if you are into re-bodying Transitional planes. Instead of all that tedious chopping, just dimension up a piece of nice hardwood (I use beech) to exactly the height of the original wood body, by the width of the blade plus a 1/32”. Then, cut the end to match exactly the cut in the original body where the cutter lays on it. It’s never exactly 45 degrees, but close. Then size to length as you wish, Then, make your forestock, again imitating the forward angle, usually about 10 degrees-ish, and cut to your preferred length. Then, sandwich the two pieces with similar full-length sides, maintaining the proper gap in the mouth. So much easier than chopping out, using a float rasp or chisels to get it right. Have fun!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2262 posts in 1484 days


#9 posted 901 days ago

That’s a great contraption. Holding the board stationary and moving the plane seems way easier than moving a board through the spinning blades of a machine. I kind of hate my jointer; any twist in the wood and it becomes a nightmare to get the wood flat and true. This set up of yours seems like it would make the process easier.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3350 posts in 2562 days


#10 posted 901 days ago

I’m watchin’ this closely ‘cause it is a great posting.
I’m not far enough into this idea, so I don’t understand how you keep from planing off your guiding edge.
How much relief do ya have at the end of the chute?
More, more, more info…..PWEEEESE.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Brett's profile

Brett

620 posts in 1284 days


#11 posted 901 days ago

Bill White, as long as the plane iron is not as wide as the base of the plane, there will always be a tiny part of the guiding edge that remains uncut. This website explains it better:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/Setting%20Up%20and%20Using%20a%20Shooting%20Board4.html

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View Frankie Talarico Jr.'s profile

Frankie Talarico Jr.

353 posts in 1958 days


#12 posted 901 days ago

Great idea,

Why not attach a 6” x length of jig to your jig. Fix it so that its 90 degrees to the blade on the blade side. Your flat 6” fence will ride on the face of your work piece. This will give you a portable device that can edge any length. Not as stable but much easier to store in my opinion. I’d also have one with a 36-40”: bed for really bad warpage on long lengths.

That is pretty cool, and way to keep it authentic to true woodworkers. Going green on a different level…nice.

-- Live by what you believe, not what they want you to believe.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3559 posts in 2336 days


#13 posted 900 days ago

Okay….another preliminary prototype for the chute board has been set up! I decided to go with this commercially available extruded aluminum sometimes known as “80/20” and to get an idea of what’s available, do a search within eBay for either “80/20 aluminum” or “T-Slot” and you’ll find it. It’s very versatile stuff for hobby builders and engineers, kinda like an Erector Set for adults. So here’s what I’ve come up with so far: Photobucket
Three runners on which the stock to be planed will sit, a ‘fence’ to provide a reference point for the final width of the stock, and a backstop, pictured here as a gnarly hunk of 2X2 beech. The sideways plane will glide on a piece of melamine. Photobucket I still have not determined what to do about making the 90-degree fence for squaring ends of lumber, maybe somehow make a pivot in the parallel fence. I want to use this unit for final dimensioning of all lumber components on small projects, i.e. components of 24” or less in length. One more pic: Photobucket
Suggestions, please? Hope you like what’s been done so far.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3837 posts in 930 days


#14 posted 900 days ago

Wow…. Poopiekat… you’re the poopiest!

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

536 posts in 1101 days


#15 posted 897 days ago

Excellent idea for the re-use of a transitional plane.

What about moving tote and knob in a more convenient way depending how you want to place yourself with respect to the system?
facing the system, moving the plane from left to right (are you lefty?) , may be with two knobs and no tote (or two totes, one for the left hand and the other for the right one) ?

or pushing the plane, with the tote at 45° (it is now at 90° from vertical) to ensure some pressure toward the board to be planed?

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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