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Cutting a rabbet with a 3" start / stop on each end on table saw

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Forum topic by jeffroL posted 898 days ago 1279 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jeffroL

10 posts in 898 days


898 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: rabbet question tablesaw

I’m trying to cut a rabbet (3/4” x 3/4”) on 5’ and 6’ lengths of timber, with a start and end 3” from each end. I would normally do this on my router table, but decided to use the table saw instead, as it is really slow trying to do this for 16 of these 5 and 6’ lengths of timber, given that the cuts are so deep and wide. It seems to be such a grind on the router and I assume the bit as well.

Can anybody advice on how I do that on the table saw, such that I have a 3” start and stop at each end. I was going to drop the timber from the top onto the spinning blade (with the riving knife off), but wasn’t too sure it was safe.

Thanks
Jeff


14 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3647 posts in 2259 days


#1 posted 898 days ago

Some set the blade at the proper height, then count the number of revolutions as you crank it down below the throat plate. You could then position the workpiece, hold it down with featherboards/push sticks, start the saw, and raise the blade into the piece the proper number of revolutions and finish the cut.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1791 days


#2 posted 898 days ago

Jeff;

Why can’t you do this on your router table? Lower the bit and do a half depth cut on your pieces then raise bit to final depth and run them through again.

Seems this would be safer?

Good luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#3 posted 898 days ago

You can do it on the table saw but I think stop rabbits are a lot bigger pain on the table saw then on the router table. If your router table is small you might consider a in feed and out feed for your router table.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Loren's profile

Loren

7223 posts in 2244 days


#4 posted 898 days ago

You can drop the timber onto the spinning blade. The heavier
the board the more control you’ll have due to mass and inertia.
Practice the cut on a 2×4 to see how it feels.

Use featherboards.

A slower way to go is start with the blade below the table
and crank it up into the cut. A variant is to sort of do
all the cuts in 1/16” increments, making the plunge
quite mild and controllable and doing all the boards at
a given depth, then raising the blade a bit and running
them through again until full depth is reached.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10533 posts in 1286 days


#5 posted 898 days ago

Do NOT ‘drop’ it onto a spinning blade! That will create way more excitement than you bargained for. If you routed the 2 ends and then connected those with the table saw, that should work. The routed rabbit would give you something to raise your blade to without the blade running. Be careful!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1791 days


#6 posted 898 days ago

3/4” in 1/16” increments = 12 passes?

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

12860 posts in 1271 days


#7 posted 898 days ago

I’m a newbie, so what do I know!

Even though I’m a newbie, I like the sound of gfadvm’s solution the best. It sounds like the best & safest way to do it.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1282 posts in 1405 days


#8 posted 898 days ago

I dont know what your building, but have you pondered running it all through the length then filling in the three inch rebate on each end ?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10533 posts in 1286 days


#9 posted 898 days ago

Cabmaker, You are a genious! Why didn’t we ALL think of that? I withdraw my suggestion. I’m going to pm you the next time I’m trying to figure out how to do something the hard way! That’s why this is such a great site. We have some very smart folks who are willing to help.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View jeffroL's profile

jeffroL

10 posts in 898 days


#10 posted 898 days ago

Thanks for your inputs folks. I might try gfadvm;s suggestion next and will let you all know how I go. I have 16 of these 5” and 6” lengths to go thru, so I want to avoid trying to raise the router bit 1/16”.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1446 days


#11 posted 898 days ago

Just a meaningful second to gadfvm’s opinion.

Trying the dado method cost me a trip to the ER many years ago, but the memory is vivid.

Use the router, sharp bit, small increments, and listen closely for high frequency chatter—it tells you you are taking too big a bite.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View jeffroL's profile

jeffroL

10 posts in 898 days


#12 posted 898 days ago

I meant 5’ and 6’ lengths…...

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1664 days


#13 posted 898 days ago

What cabmaker said. It’s much simpler and safer.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View jeffroL's profile

jeffroL

10 posts in 898 days


#14 posted 898 days ago

Yes, as I think more about this, I’m leaning towards cabmakers’s way. Thanks folks.

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