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stain...removal?

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Forum topic by rhybeka posted 02-05-2012 09:03 PM 797 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rhybeka

285 posts in 1808 days


02-05-2012 09:03 PM

Ok, so I can’t remember where I got the crazy idea of trying to finish my pieces to save myself down the line or attempt to get a smoother finish on the inside of my cabinet case – but I did. Of course, through this whole process of just trying to get the entertainment center together, I now have to find the best way to strip the 3/4 red oak ply inside of my cabinet. I’m realizing there is probably not a fast way to do this, but i wanted to make sure I get a proper start. I’ve started with one round of 80/100 grit on an orbital sander and it is slow going. Would using a stripper be advisable to get into the spots where the sander can’t reach, or should I just resign myself to hand sanding?

I’m sure this is an easy one for you seasoned pro’s – I’m just trying not to rush this even for as much as I want to finish so I can get to work on some shop storage. :D Thanks for the advice everyone!

-- aspiring jill of all trades


10 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

862 posts in 1003 days


#1 posted 02-05-2012 11:07 PM

Using paint stripper is much less work than sanding for finish removal.

I’m not quite understanding the reason why you are removing the finish though.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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rhybeka

285 posts in 1808 days


#2 posted 02-05-2012 11:50 PM

I’m removing it since well – besides being committed now – I wanted to make sure the in varnished parts would match. Too bad I realizes too late I could just do the unvarnished pieces carefully. Another duh moment! Better get on that lessons learned notebook!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

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CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2905 days


#3 posted 02-05-2012 11:51 PM

You are trying to remove stain from oak plywood?

I’ll be interested to see if anyone has an easy method. I would have said it was downright impossible. I’m surprised you can even sand it off without sanding through the veneer layer.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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a1Jim

112298 posts in 2263 days


#4 posted 02-06-2012 12:03 AM

If you do not have adjustable shelves in your cabinets save yourself a lot of trouble and buy some oak door skins 1/8” thick cut it to the size of the interior inside cabinet sides , pre-finish the piece you have cut to size then glue in place. I use contact cement. It will look like new. A lot less trouble then messing around with stripping the inside of cabinets.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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JAAune

862 posts in 1003 days


#5 posted 02-06-2012 12:08 AM

Removing stain isn’t a very easy task but once the finish is off, another application of paint stripper will remove some of the stain. Further scrubbing with lacquer thinner and Scotchbrite will remove some more.

Outside of wood bleach, I doubt you’ll even come close to reaching an unfinished color. I’ve succeeded in removing the majority of a red stain on an old piano once but the wood still didn’t look anything like fresh veneer. I still had to do some staining on the new wood to make it look like the old.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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chrisstef

11112 posts in 1693 days


#6 posted 02-06-2012 05:14 PM

id veneer rthe inside of the cabinet and not even attempt to “unstain” a piece, id asume that the plywood did a pretty good job of soaking the stain in.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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rhybeka

285 posts in 1808 days


#7 posted 02-07-2012 01:45 AM

Hm. Thanks for the good thoughts guys!

I think my course of action is going to be rubbing it all down with a tack cloth and try some of this ‘organic’ stripper I got at Lowes. Honestly, if I can just get it close, I’ll be happy – it’s the inside of a cabinet, but being the igit I can be, I started to sand it down I’m a bit stuck now. @Jim, unfortunately I do have adjustable shelves – but I do like the door skin idea. It’s a thought tho. Next time : a) don’t finish until you’re DONE, b) if it’s finished, leave it that way and stain everything else to match!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

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JAAune

862 posts in 1003 days


#8 posted 02-07-2012 02:37 AM

There are actually good reasons for prefinishing parts before assembly. I do it all the time. However, you do need to know exactly when and how to do it.

Techniques like that are learned over time. Finishing is just one of those things that can be learned from other people and books but is hard to get right until lots of hands-on practice has gone into it.

Be careful using the “organic” stuff. I’ve used it before and it works but some of it is water-based. You’ll probably have to apply a thick coat then cover the wood with plastic for a few hours to get it to work well. That means the plywood needs to be able to resist the water for that period of time. It’s probably still toxic too in spite of the green labels and such so I’d still recommend good ventilation and full safety gear.

I’d recommend some testing of the product on a small piece of scrap to get the hang of it.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2491 posts in 2429 days


#9 posted 02-07-2012 02:40 AM

I’d ask Charles Neil directly – - – - he is the finishing master

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112298 posts in 2263 days


#10 posted 02-07-2012 02:51 AM

I have veneered door skins on the in side of cabinets with adjustable shelves but it’s a bit more involve. After you have you 1/8” material cut to size you cut some small piece of dowel all the same size about 1/4” longer than the depth of the pin holes make sure they are all in place and very carefully mark the end of each dowel with stain or lip stick and then push the panel in place and tap up and down making sure you are getting good contact on all of the dowels.Then remove the 1/8” panel and drill the same size holes that you cabinet has for you adjustable pens where the marks where transferred.. The hard part is getting the 1/8” panel out . What I do is cut the panel a 1/8” short on the sides and top and place some tape on both sides to use as handles to get the panel out with. If done carefully no one will every know there’s been a repair.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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