LumberJocks

Bench top board alignment.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Matt Stauffer posted 02-05-2012 05:10 AM 1247 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


02-05-2012 05:10 AM

I’m 3/4 done with my Nicholson style bench and am stuck on the top. I’ve got the best southern yellow pine that South Alabama has to offer (which is far from perfect). I’ve got all the joining edges planed smooth, but the boards have bows that I can do nothing about. I clamped all the boards together in a stack hoping they would flatten out or something, but no luck. I am thinking about using oak dowels along the length of the 8 foot planks to make them behave. I don’t know if this will work long term or not. Any ideas on how to work this out? I honestly can’t find any boards better than these at the box stores.

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24


16 replies so far

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2092 days


#1 posted 02-05-2012 05:55 AM

Can’t get them straight with a Jointer?

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


#2 posted 02-05-2012 06:48 AM

Finally got a photo up. The edges of the planks are jointed, but the boards do not want to lay flat. I bought the wood over a year ago and it has had more than enough time to “settle” out. In my picture you can see the misalignment that I’m concerned about. Hoping that using some oak dowels along the jointed edge will help the top to stay flattish.

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2092 days


#3 posted 02-05-2012 06:52 AM

Do you have a jointer wide enough to face joint the boards?

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


#4 posted 02-05-2012 07:53 AM

“Do you have a jointer wide enough to face joint the boards?” – MoPower

Yes, but it takes too many green chile burritos to power it.

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2092 days


#5 posted 02-05-2012 08:11 AM

LOL. I guess dowels are probably your best answer, or another idea may be to try a tongue and groove joint using a router and rabbiting bit ?

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


#6 posted 02-05-2012 08:36 AM

You probably guessed that my router looked something like this…

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2092 days


#7 posted 02-05-2012 08:40 AM

I’ve been sitting here thinking about the tongue and groove idea and I think that would be a good way to go. Looking at the pic of your boards, they are not bowed that sharp, so a small based router with a 1/2” ball bearing rabbiting bit should easily follow the contour of the board easily keeping everything centered while cutting both the tongue and grooves.
The only down side I see is that the width of the top will be decreased by the depth of the joint at each joint.
the up side is that it will be a strong joint and easier to assemble than dowels.

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112367 posts in 2273 days


#8 posted 02-05-2012 08:46 AM

Did you buy kiln dried wood? If your woods dry enough your should be able to just glue them togehter let them dry and they will hold assuming you have enough clamps. You can glue one half of the bench top at a time and then glue the two halves together to make it easier. If you use dowels you will have problems aligning the dowels on bowed boards.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2092 days


#9 posted 02-05-2012 08:48 AM

Well…I guess it’s either lots of burritos or lots of dowels ! Those burrito powered tools can sure put the weight on if your not careful.

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


#10 posted 02-05-2012 09:21 AM

It’s getting late, so I guess I’ll save these for tommorow and try the burritos and dowel rods.

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24

View wdworking's profile

wdworking

31 posts in 1097 days


#11 posted 02-05-2012 10:44 AM

I used SYP for my top but, I bought 2×10’s and cut them into 3 sections each. Turned them end on end to make the table at least 3” thick. I put the cut side down and after I glued them up, I turned the top over and that was my top. I have planed it on an angle to make it flat. I have less than $30 in the top. I have also drilled 3/4” dog holes into it. Looks good. It’s not soft maple like I would prefer, but it will do for now.

Hope this helps.

-- Craig http://www.wouldworking.com

View William's profile

William

9162 posts in 1539 days


#12 posted 02-05-2012 03:34 PM

I agree with Jim that if you can get them into line and glue them straight, they’ll hold each other straight. I suggest alternating any curve in the end grain, the way you would any kitchen table top or picnic table.

Also, the dowel point centers you show, if you can’t get them to lay in line to start with, those are going to be hell to get lined up right.
Another option that would be less of a pain to line up would be a biscuit jointer. As long as the bow isn’t sharp enough to interfere with the fence on a hand held biscuit jointer to set flat, You can mark and cut your slots for the biscuits at certain spots along the length. Then glue the board together using biscuits. Apply firm, but not overly tight pressure with clamps. Use a rubber mallet to know out any remaining (should be very tiny with biscuits in place) deviation between the boards. Then tighten the clamps on down and let dry.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View wdworking's profile

wdworking

31 posts in 1097 days


#13 posted 02-05-2012 11:16 PM

You can disregard my earlier post. I looked up a Nicholson style bench afterwards.

-- Craig http://www.wouldworking.com

View jmpreiks's profile

jmpreiks

11 posts in 1019 days


#14 posted 02-06-2012 04:41 AM

Some cauls should help line those up during the glue up. You shouldn’t need any fancy joinery in my opinion.

View Matt Stauffer's profile

Matt Stauffer

95 posts in 1462 days


#15 posted 02-06-2012 05:08 AM

Good “caul”!
I got some work done today on the most laborious piece of the top. I cut all the dog holes with a sash saw and used a chisel to knock out the majority of the waste, and used my burrito powered router to get a clean bottom. Still have to clear a notch for the head of the dogs and custom fit each dog hole so that the dogs can fully hide if needed.

-- Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. ~ John 5:24

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase