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Flat clearcoat?

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Forum topic by Ben posted 02-04-2012 07:12 PM 1622 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


02-04-2012 07:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shabby chic flat finish clear coat help

I work with architectural antiques and I repair/rebuild/re-purpose a lot of things that still have the old paint on them. I really don’t like the possibility that someone would use something I sold them in their home that may have lead paint exposed. Anyone have suggestions for a finish that would not gloss up or detract from that nice worn “shabby chic” look, yet protect the end user from anything toxic?

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes


18 replies so far

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a1Jim

112094 posts in 2233 days


#1 posted 02-04-2012 07:21 PM

How about a shellac based primer with flat latex paint on top.The primer will seal in any lead paint and the flat latex can be any color you want.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#2 posted 02-04-2012 07:46 PM

Well, I’m looking for something that will cover and seal, but still leave that old crackling, chippy paint visible. The boss likes to leave it there because that is what a lot of our customers like, but I hate the idea of leaving the lead paint exposed. Would the primer alone be ok and would it be “flat” as in no gloss at all? I’d like to seal it without changing the look too much. Thanks for the input, I appreciate it

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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a1Jim

112094 posts in 2233 days


#3 posted 02-04-2012 07:53 PM

You might consider shellac ,it seals most anything. after a couple coats you can sand it with some 150 grit to take the shine of of it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#4 posted 02-04-2012 08:06 PM

I have yet to use shellac at all, but I need to expand my horizons in the finishing department. I haven’t really done a lot and have mostly used different types of poly. I had tried just sanding and steel wool to get rid of the gloss, but it still LOOKS like it was re-coated. I may not be able to avoid that, but I would like to minimize that as much as possible

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#5 posted 02-04-2012 08:09 PM

You seem to be the first commenter on so many posts, it makes me wonder if LJ installed a chip in your brain so your thoughts automatically transfer to posts. :P

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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a1Jim

112094 posts in 2233 days


#6 posted 02-04-2012 08:26 PM

So that’s what it is a micro chip? they must have done that while I was sleeping LOL
If you want to try shellac it comes in rattle cans. Just try a spot that doesn’t show much and see what you think.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#7 posted 02-04-2012 08:32 PM

I do believe I will give it a shot. I really need to buy a few sample products just to give a range of finishes a try. Just so I know if nothing else. Thanks a bunch

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#8 posted 02-04-2012 08:35 PM

I’m going to get to adding a few things to my gallery as that is empty thus far. I hesitated to put pics of what I do because most of it is already built, but I repair it or add to it or reuse the parts. Either way, it is what I do and does require woodworking, so there is that…

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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Clint Searl

1455 posts in 1017 days


#9 posted 02-06-2012 06:48 AM

Waterborne poly

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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a1Jim

112094 posts in 2233 days


#10 posted 02-06-2012 07:47 AM

Post what you like Ben every body else does. if you made to day or ten years ago go for it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#11 posted 02-06-2012 07:58 AM

Well, when I say it is already built, I mean it was built by a much finer craftsman than myself, many years before I was born. I will post a project with a few things I’ve put back together sometime soon, but although I put them back in useful order, I can’t really claim them as my own projects. I will post things that I have actually built using old parts, along with anything entirely new. I’ll be doing a blog soon that explains a bit more about where I’m coming from and what I do.

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2874 days


#12 posted 02-06-2012 03:51 PM

Ben, you’re right about the project section being for original work, but there is no reason not to post pics of your restorations in a forum topic like this.

I think either blonde shellac or water-based satin poly would be good solutions for you.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Lifesaver2000

517 posts in 1768 days


#13 posted 02-06-2012 04:13 PM

Ben, I am curious about the regulations concerning the reuse of something with lead paint, especially if it is being taken from one building and put in another. The most recently completed This Old House series had quite a bit of stuff about what was required as far as protection of personnel and the removal and disposal of anything with lead based paint, and the need to test for it before doing anything. They seemed to imply that they were federal regulations, so they would apply anywhere here in the USA.

Is this something you have to deal with, or are the things you are doing too small to be regulated?

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canadianchips

1831 posts in 1653 days


#14 posted 02-06-2012 04:34 PM

I use a product called “polycrylic”.
Your concern about lead is a fair one. If it is covered it is safe. Inhaling the dust while sanding it is not good, covering it with a poly or shellac will make it safe.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Ben

302 posts in 986 days


#15 posted 02-06-2012 04:55 PM

Canadianchips, safe is the main thing I care about.

Lifesaver2000, My “boss” and I mostly sell everything rough, as it all would need refinished to be able to be used. It is mostly sold “as is”. More and more, I have been choosing a few things here and there that I put back to usable order, and the paint has just the perfect wear and chipping paint that lots of people like. When I do that, I would like them to be able to keep that look with no trouble or worry. I know there are regs on that and I have been doing some research. So far it has only been a few items that I would like to have sealed, but that is really the customers responsibility. We take things out of condemned houses that are slated for demolition. Save it and sell it is our business, not refinishing. Lately, I’ve been using up extra pieces and parts that have accumulated and unsellable in their current form. Those pieces I would like to seal, as I want them to be a finished project that could be put right in your house… SAFELY

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

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