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Jointer rehab question

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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 02-03-2012 04:07 PM 1191 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


02-03-2012 04:07 PM

All right gang, another rookie question on rehabbing an old jointer. So i picked up a rockwell 37-220 jointer and ive been scrapping the crust off the old tank and im curious as to how you guys feel about sanding the bed of a jointer. Obviously i dont want to screw this thing up so ive used naval jelly and some elbow grease to get most of the rust off but its left some streaky spots of that good old black rust. Should i dare take my ROS sander to it or am i asking for problems?

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk


12 replies so far

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2308 posts in 2297 days


#1 posted 02-03-2012 04:09 PM

moar naval jelly is what I say! any pics?

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

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patron

13537 posts in 2805 days


#2 posted 02-03-2012 04:12 PM

that’s what i do with rusty surface tools
this isn’t space tolerances
smooth is great
and flat is relative

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


#3 posted 02-03-2012 04:15 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/34283

Of course there’s pics Soda! Like they say around here no pics it didnt happen.

Patron – thanks for the expertise … i think ill start at 320 grits just to be safe. Would i want to remove the old mill marks or leave them for the most part?

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#4 posted 02-03-2012 04:44 PM

Aside from surfacing at a machine shop (which would defeat the purpo$e of restoring vintage), I think you’re pursuing your best option. I don’t think I’d go past the milling if it were me. I think the amount of planarity lost (is that a word), flatness, straightness, whatever, using sandpaper is a minimal risk. Whatever you do, the tools is much better off than when you found it:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


#5 posted 02-03-2012 04:50 PM

Al, Its come a long way so far. Ill be replacing the bearings this weekend and im on the hunt for some cast iron pulleys to replace the aluminum ones. BTW .. theres a vintage Darra James tablesaw on the craiger in my area right now. I hope this vintage machinery bug dont bite me or i may end up with a serious project lol.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2157 days


#6 posted 02-03-2012 04:52 PM

I’ve promised myself that I’ll keep my current tablesaw until 1) I find a big fat vintage Oliver or 2) I spring for the PM2000. I try not to even look at other saws, lest I be seduced:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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489tad

3099 posts in 2476 days


#7 posted 02-03-2012 05:51 PM

Chris, here’s a couple of options for you. Your in the rehab biz, find a piece of granite back splash a little longer than the jointer top, spray glue on some grit and treat the top the same as a plane rehab only upside down. You’ll get a good work out too. I’ve used the green pads under a sander to polish my tops. Good luck.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


#8 posted 02-03-2012 08:14 PM

Ah Hah! Dan your genious …. Ive actually got an old piece of granite cut off in the basement for the specific purppose of sharpening. I would have never thought to do that. Now i just need another strong guy and we can buck saw that son of a ….

I hit the top with some 320 sandpaper in a block but it left a lot to be desired.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1797 days


#9 posted 02-03-2012 09:05 PM

I use 400 grit wet/dry paper with mineral spirits on a rubber block. It works fine every time. I put the mineral spirits in a small puddle on the surface and spread it around with the block then I start sanding it.
I’ve done this on six cast iron tables and it works perfectly every time.

Al,
How would re-machining defeat the purpose of restoration? Isn’t the purpose of a restoration to make it look as good as when it rolled out of the factory? If you’re talking about cost, then I can see why.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


#10 posted 02-03-2012 09:08 PM

Thanks for the info Tyrone, much appreciated. Before i go heaving around a 25 lbs piece of granite im definately going to try the mineral spirits and sandpaper. I havent got a really reliable straight edge so i dont know how coplaner the tables actually are. Soon enough we’ll find out though.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View sikrap's profile

sikrap

1121 posts in 2823 days


#11 posted 02-03-2012 09:08 PM

You might want to try the Sandflex blocks. They are made for this kind of thing. You can get them at Amazon, but the price at Klingspor is much better ($9.95 for all 3 grits). I’ve used them on a TS top and I’ve spoken with guys that have used them for jointers, band saw tables, blah blah blah. HTH

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3137 days


#12 posted 02-03-2012 09:43 PM

320 or 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper is a good choice.

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