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Forum topic by HorizontalMike posted 01-29-2012 07:01 PM 1031 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1571 days


01-29-2012 07:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rabbet glass window casing bookcase question

I am progressing right along on my Barrister’s Bookcase in White Ash and have just glued up the window casings for the front of each shelf/cell. I am using 3/4in X 2in frames with a 3/8in rabbet. The rabbeted opening measures
31 1/16in X 11in.

QUESTION: How much do/should I undersize the glass to the opening in order to account for the seasonal shrink/swell cycle of the wood?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."


10 replies so far

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2456 days


#1 posted 01-29-2012 08:35 PM

I leave 1/16” undersized when I build with glass panels. just make sure you either clip it or secure it properly to avoid rattle.

-- making sawdust....

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3457 posts in 2618 days


#2 posted 01-29-2012 08:45 PM

1/16” is good. I would use a small bead strip and pin nails to “stop the glass. Just a nice finishing touch.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days


#3 posted 01-29-2012 08:54 PM

I make mine about 1/8” over and use screen spline on one side and the bottom, to allow for expansion and stop it from rattling.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1571 days


#4 posted 01-30-2012 02:22 AM

Hey thanks guys, this is my first for this and I was wondering if 1/16 to 1/8in was enough. Heck once I finally get done with this thing I’ll be the king of the world! Thanks so much, it is finally coming together! I actually have the 1/16 on the 31 1/16in measurement but come up short on the 11in. side. This will be the first time ordering glass to size so we will see how easy/hard this really is… ;-)

Thanks AGAIN!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View casual1carpenter's profile

casual1carpenter

353 posts in 1133 days


#5 posted 01-30-2012 05:46 AM

Mike, I don’t know about where you are getting your glass, but my glass guy would be happy if I brought the door frame in. He told me it’s just as easy for him after all to sort of double check me and just good business. He does glass and mirrors, and helped me dig my way out of a mistake before.

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days


#6 posted 01-30-2012 02:58 PM

+1 what casualcarpenter said. Guys that cut glass seem to give themselves about a plus or minus 1/8” variation (or more) when cutting glass. If you can, take the frames in and let them fit the glass.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1571 days


#7 posted 01-30-2012 03:22 PM

Taking the frames in sounds like the best bet. Currently I am still trying to figure out where to do business locally. Can’t find much other than numerous “auto-glass” shops, etc.

I need to get everything sanded down, stained, and finished before proceeding but sure appreciate the advice on sizing. This my first, and I am sure that things will be much easier from here on out.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days


#8 posted 01-30-2012 04:28 PM

Mike, check you local lumber yards. The little yard here in San Saba sells glass a lot cheaper than the glass shops.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1571 days


#9 posted 01-31-2012 02:56 AM

Well, the local HD came through with some 3/32in 12in X 36in clear glass that I have to re-size. Bought the glass cutter and a “new” hobby (NOT). I bought six, enough for two bookcases. If I screw up, I can still complete ONE good bookcase. If I dewz GOOD… I can stretch two bookcases out of the purchase… At less than $6.50 a pane, I figured I couldn’t really be losing anything. Cost me that much in gas to get there. ;-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 988 days


#10 posted 01-31-2012 06:03 AM

Soak your cutter tip end in kerosene. “Paint” your cut line with a 1/2” brush with kero too. Learned that in the glass shop. Makes the wheel cut smoother.

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

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