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Forum topic by KPW posted 01-28-2012 12:31 AM 990 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KPW

223 posts in 1121 days


01-28-2012 12:31 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I asked this question once before and didn’t seem to get much response. I tried to research it on the forums and still had no luck. I’m thinking of making scaled down versions of furniture and I’m not sure how to deal with the plans. Can anyone help?

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.


13 replies so far

View bent's profile

bent

311 posts in 2421 days


#1 posted 01-28-2012 12:42 AM

can’t you just divide all the measurements by the scale you want to use? for example, if you want 1:4 scale, just divide all the measurements by 4.

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Danpaddles

540 posts in 1064 days


#2 posted 01-28-2012 12:49 AM

Are you talking about making doll house furniture? Or just a little bit smaller stuff? As sizes get smaller, material thickness gets smaller, you will have to consider using different joints. Non-functional furniture might be easier to make- no one will fall to the floor sitting on it. OTOH, a table and chair set for your little girl might need to be made more robust.

Give us a little more to go on- what are your goals, who is this for?

-- Dan V. in Indy

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1121 days


#3 posted 01-28-2012 12:50 AM

I guess I’m over complicating this. I thought there was some kind of ratio involved. Now that I’ve heard it from you bent, I guess you’re right. No wonder nobody responded before. Drrrrr!

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1173 days


#4 posted 01-28-2012 12:50 AM

I had a commission once for a pedistal table—very intricately carved and fluted with lots of trim moldings to boot.
The commission specified a second table at precisely 3/4 scale to compliment the first. Trim moldings, carvings, joinery—everything. Whatever dimension the original was times 0.75.

It was a real PITA, as all the jigs, etc, were doubled. Fortunately, I either had, or was able to acquire, all my router bit profiles in both sizes. It worked out really nice in the end.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1121 days


#5 posted 01-28-2012 12:53 AM

I have a plan for a period bombay chest. I want to make 3 jewelry box replicas for my women folk.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View AndyDuframe's profile

AndyDuframe

48 posts in 2342 days


#6 posted 01-28-2012 01:48 AM

Not sure if this relates exactly to what you’re talking about, but I have kind of an interesting system for building “scaled down versions” of furniture. In fact, I’ve found it really helpful to build a miniature version of a project first, just to get and idea what the piece might look like, and also see what changes I might want to make to the design—before investing money in the full size lumber.

To make it work, I had to create scaled-down versions of the boards I might typically buy at a home center—1×12s, 2×4s, 2×6s, etc. For the sake of simplicity, I made everything 1/10 scale.

Anyway, I don’t mean to make this into an advertisement, but I do sell this stuff at my website now.

-- http://www.ezwoodshop.com

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1489 posts in 2877 days


#7 posted 01-28-2012 06:24 PM

Model Railroaders have rulers re-scaled to the appropriate dimensions, ticks every 1/87th of a foot for HO feet, for instance. Doll house furniture is usually in 1:12 scale, 1” = 1’, so a good hobby shop may sell a ruler with inches and twelfths for feet and inches.

If you can’t buy the ruler off-the-shelf, I’d either draw one up, or set up a computer to print one. Laminate some card stock and you’re set.

If you’re going for larger sizes, like ¼scale, you might want to make a pantograph to help you resize.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

540 posts in 1064 days


#8 posted 01-28-2012 07:13 PM

KPW- in that case, you might think about finding a jewelry box plan that looks like a Bombay chest! Or take an existing jewelry box plan and modify it to the look you are going for.

It could be a very challenging project to downscale. I found a bunch of picts of boxes already sized appropriately, that might be more fun to build. Depends on your skills and experience I guess.

To put this as kindly as I can- the fact you are asking the question leads me to think you might get more enjoyment building to plans that are already sized correctly. Unless I am wrong- but those front side compound curves give me the willies to think about cutting!

Good luck, let us know what you decide.

-- Dan V. in Indy

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1121 days


#9 posted 01-29-2012 03:28 PM

Thanks to all for their advice. Dan L, Inever thought about building a pantograph.Do you know of alink? Paddles the curved cuts are notthat scarey. I’ve seen them cut out in increments on a tablesaw with the stock lying flat and then you chop them out with chisels and gouges.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1489 posts in 2877 days


#10 posted 01-30-2012 01:49 AM

I don’t know about a link specifically to plans, but they aren’t that hard to figure out. Rockler sells one for re-scaling drawings (looks like the configuration they’ve got that in in their product shot will give you ½ the original size), and a search of LumberJocks for "pantograph" turns up a whole lot of pantographs made to move routers.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1603 days


#11 posted 01-30-2012 04:23 AM

Starrett sells (as doubtless others) a 6” scale that has inches in tenths on one side. Very handy in working on ratios and scales. Fractions can be fractious, but decimals will raise your joy by decibels.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View WillAdams's profile

WillAdams

78 posts in 747 days


#12 posted 12-14-2012 11:55 AM

For 1/12th scale you can use a computer Pica rule—- just don’t get an old printer’s rule (they were 72.27 points per inch in the U.S.)

http://www.schaedlerprecision.com/

View derosa's profile

derosa

1557 posts in 1588 days


#13 posted 12-14-2012 01:34 PM

Just get a 3 sided drafting ruler, 5 of the edges are designed for drawing scale.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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