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Infill Scrub Plane?

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Forum topic by CartersWhittling posted 01-27-2012 12:17 AM 2039 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CartersWhittling

453 posts in 2136 days


01-27-2012 12:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question scrub plane infill plane

Hello.
I was doing some research on scrub planes and a question came to me. Are there any infill scrub planes? Scrub planes are generally found in the:
wooden european style

aswell as some metal bodied planes

and other shop made planes, but I have never seen an infill scrub plane. Does anybody know if any were ever sold?

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/


9 replies so far

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jusfine

2405 posts in 2388 days


#1 posted 01-27-2012 12:48 AM

I have a number of older European infill planes (Norris, Spiers, etc) and have never come across one.
Some have open enough mouths that you could easy camber a blade and create your own.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#2 posted 01-27-2012 02:35 AM

Scrub planes are less tiring to use if they are not too heavy,
so the use of infill to add mass to a scrub would make the
plane not so ideal in use.

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CartersWhittling

453 posts in 2136 days


#3 posted 01-27-2012 07:05 PM

You make a good point Loren. I have a wood Krenov style scrub plane that is about 12 inches long which is nice to use because it is so light. Although a heavier plane can be nice when working in harder woods.

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/

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CartersWhittling

453 posts in 2136 days


#4 posted 01-28-2012 07:01 PM

I have a theory. The scrub plane originated and was used primarily by German cabinetmakers, and from what I understand, the infill plane was general made by English plane makers. Perhaps because of this the English infill plane makers never made scrub planes, and it wasn’t until the late 1800’s that Stanley started making their metal bodied scrub plane. Any thoughts?

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/

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Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#5 posted 01-28-2012 09:33 PM

Every culture that used boards had some way to flatten them
to a rough thickness. Could be an adze, could be a scrub. The
reason old wood scrub planes didn’t survive is they were used
hard and thrown away.

As a regular coffin-style plane is used, the bottom wears and the
mouth opens. Eventually it becomes usable only as a scrub plane.

The English infills developed because the English industrial revolution
was creating tremendous wealth and exports of cloth and other products
from the UK. When the ships returned they brought exotic hard woods
back to England which could be worked to a fine standard with
planes suited to the job. The density of infill planes and the higher
pitch angles evolved due to the availability of the new exotic timbers
to the English cabinet makers.

England was pretty much deforested at that time. I don’t remember
where I picked up this information about the evolution of English
planes but I am not just pulling it from my ear – I read it somewhere.

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CartersWhittling

453 posts in 2136 days


#6 posted 01-29-2012 09:04 PM

That makes sense, but it doesn’t answer whether infill scrub planes exist or not, and why. I would imagine if any infill scrub planes were made that they would still be around because they do not wear like wood bodied planes, like you mentioned.

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2155 days


#7 posted 01-29-2012 09:07 PM

I can’t say that I’ve ever seen an infill scrub, meaning a sleeker body and cambered iron. Perhaps you’ll make the first? ;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2577 days


#8 posted 01-29-2012 09:27 PM

I don´t think you will ever find an infill scrubplane
since it takes so long to make a good infill plane and they were costly back then compared to
woodenplanes
and they were designated mostly to finish work from the start of the development of infills
and the scrubplane has more or less always been looked at as a thirdrange plane
why I can´t understand since it realy a hardworking member of the family
I gess it cuold have something to do with that it was the first planing job many apprentices
did back then
if a carpenter had an infill you can bett the new boss wuld get a glimt of it if the carpenter was to an interwiew for a new job back then
back then the toolbox and the tools inside was his only advertising of how skilled they were and how they
cept the tools told alot about how the man work
only the best skilled cuold afford and wuold have the knowledge of what bennefits an infill wuold give him
when working with it/them

Dennis

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CartersWhittling

453 posts in 2136 days


#9 posted 01-30-2012 01:02 AM

Interesting comments. Perhaps because an infill plane was so expensive to buy and there doesn’t seem to be any advantage to an infill scrub plane, they were never made. I know personally I would never spend a lot of money for a fancy scrub plane because they do not need to same fine qualities that are necessary in a smoother. Perhaps the infill makers foresaw there would be very little market for an infill scrub place for the same reason, and therefore never made them.

-- And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord... Colossians 3:23 http://carterswhittling.wordpress.com/

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