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Making feet for leg bottoms

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Forum topic by scrollfreak posted 01-24-2012 04:25 PM 726 views 0 times favorited 1 reply Add to Favorites Watch
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scrollfreak

15 posts in 1789 days


01-24-2012 04:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip

For some of you fellow woodworking maniacs, here’s a tip for making those little plastic feet for the bottom of legs. As most of you know you can purchase these just about anywhere. But I just don’t like paying for something I can make myself. I found a very inexpensive way to make them. I’m sure you have seen those teflon cutting boards used in the kitchen. I purchased one at Wally-world (walmart) for about 2 bucks. They are about 1/4” thick and are perfect for this purpose. I used a 1 1/4” holesaw (you can use any size needed) to cut my feet out. Since the holesaw has a drill bit attached, the center hole is done at the same time. Just countersink for the screw and attach to the leg bottom. I make custom plant stands with 12×12 granite or marble insert tops which I purchase from a place in my town where new and used building supplies are donated and resold. These make perfect feet to keep legs off wet surfaces or to protect floors. I can make about 30 for the price of an 8 pack. Oh, and check to see if there is a Habitat for Humanity ReStore near you. That is where I get a lot of supplies and materials. Just bought 54 board feet of red oak 4/4 lumber for 50 bucks. They also get a lot of stains and urethanes donated. Recently purchased several new unopened gallons of urethane for 5 bucks a gallon. Happy woodworking.


1 reply so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4449 posts in 3421 days


#1 posted 01-24-2012 07:52 PM

The material you are using is UHMW “plastic” (for a better word). I have used it a bunch just as you state. Machines well, and I even have it as foot pads for my lathe. It is much easier on the shop floor (CVT).
BTW, that’s the only cutting board material to use in the kitchen. If they get too rough, just sand ‘em smooth and put ‘em back to work.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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