LumberJocks

"New" Japanese Plane question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by willy66 posted 01-18-2012 06:53 PM 995 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View willy66's profile

willy66

44 posts in 2067 days


01-18-2012 06:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

Hi All!

I just received an old Japanese style hand plane from a co-worker. I know very little about these planes. I have checked the sole and see that it is concave across its width. My instinct is that the wood warped. Before I true this sole up, I want to make sure that this is not part of the function of the tool.

Here is a link to what seems to be the exact same plane, not much info on it though.

http://www.fine-tools.com/jhobm.htm

-- -Willy, White Plains, NY


7 replies so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

892 posts in 2417 days


#1 posted 01-19-2012 01:52 AM

Willy66, the Japanese planes are supposed to have concave soles at certain points across the length of them. You should research them on the web to see how the do this to one to tune it up.

-- Mike

View fissionchips's profile

fissionchips

99 posts in 1923 days


#2 posted 01-20-2012 08:34 PM

There seems to be a resurgence of interest in these planes. I hope you can put some time into tuning it, as the results are extremely worthwhile.

You will want to flatten the concave across the plane sole using sandpaper on a flat surface or any type of flat scraper you have. The warpage occurs from changes in humidity, but once the plane is in use by you it should stay fairly true.

I am a recent convert to kanna, and have done my homework finding out all I can through the web. Stay tuned and I’ll be assembling these materials into a blog post. In the mean time, mafe has a great tutorial on kanna set up.

View Newage Neanderthal's profile

Newage Neanderthal

190 posts in 2015 days


#3 posted 01-20-2012 08:49 PM

If its a smoother you only want touch points at the very front and right in front of the mouth, an additional one at the rear if a jointer. On a smoother the two points are in the same plane, on a jointer the middle point is slightly recessed (about the amount of the shaving thickness) Do NOT flatten the whole thing on a Japanese plane, it is supposed to be recessed everywhere else to work correctly.

-- www.newageneanderthal.blogspot.com . @NANeanderthal on twitter

View Newage Neanderthal's profile

Newage Neanderthal

190 posts in 2015 days


#4 posted 01-20-2012 08:54 PM

Have a look at this post of at Wilbur’s blog. I would recommend spending some time on his blog in general if interested in Japanese tools. He is the man how taught the Shwarz how to use them at WIA after all.

-- www.newageneanderthal.blogspot.com . @NANeanderthal on twitter

View fissionchips's profile

fissionchips

99 posts in 1923 days


#5 posted 01-20-2012 08:59 PM

Certainly NN, but in some cases if the cupping across the width is large enough, flattening out the cupping is equivalent to flattening the entire sole. The important thing is to establish a flat reference surface for the touch points, after which the lengthwise concave sections can be established.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#6 posted 01-20-2012 09:24 PM

Toshio Odate has a book, probably back in print now. The book
is quite good about the Japanese tools. There are probably
some other books out now too.

Don’t put a micro-bevel on the iron. Use a single bevel with
Japan laminate irons.

View Newage Neanderthal's profile

Newage Neanderthal

190 posts in 2015 days


#7 posted 01-20-2012 09:26 PM

I would agree fission, simply want to point out that there is supposed to a concave surface, and to not make the whole thing flat.

-- www.newageneanderthal.blogspot.com . @NANeanderthal on twitter

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com