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Who has a pin router - overarm router?

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Forum topic by Loren posted 01-17-2012 at 02:14 PM 4127 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


01-17-2012 at 02:14 PM

I just acquired a “mid-sized” (about 700lbs and 7 feet tall) overarm
router by Delta/Invicta. It was a bargain, not a phase problem, small
enough to not dominate my shop, and I’ve wanted a real pin router
for awhile.

Of course CNC has replaced pin routers for a lot of things, but the
pin router table tilts no there’s a way to cut angled mortised on
curved chair backs and so forth.

Anyway, is anybody here really using a pin router?

-- http://lawoodworking.com


20 replies so far

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helluvawreck

15659 posts in 1504 days


#1 posted 01-17-2012 at 02:25 PM

We don’t have a pin router at the plant anymore. I wish that we did. You can actually find them at a bargain usually at industrial woodworking auctions for as little as $250 or so sometimes. You can do a whole lot with them and the jigs are easy to make. They usually have far more HP than any router you’re going to find. usually along with the router you will also see a whole batch of cutters and bits that they used with the router.

helluvawreck

https://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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a1Jim

112028 posts in 2214 days


#2 posted 01-17-2012 at 02:25 PM

Enjoy Loren,I hope it’s does what you need to do. If I recall you have fairly tight quarters in your shop like I do .I hope you can squeeze it in ok.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


#3 posted 01-17-2012 at 02:35 PM

I’ve owned a little one for years and it’s the fastest way to excavate
channels or bushing-guided router jigs. It was really helpful when
I tooled-up to build classical guitars but not nearly heavy enough to
do the cavity routing electric guitar and bass guys do with them.

I may put the smaller one in storage after I get the new one set up.
We’ll see. It’s real convenient to just set up a fence and plow a groove
with an overarm router. I don’t want to imply they aren’t dangerous
machines, but in my experience I can set up and make cuts in
a sort of more intuitive and fluid way than is normally feasible with
router table or topside router type setups.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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cabmaker

1311 posts in 1446 days


#4 posted 01-17-2012 at 04:03 PM

Loren, a pin router was one of the most unused tools in my shop of long ago. It was bigf and heavy. Its long gone now but it is only in the past few years that I wish I still had one on occasion. I am also a big fan of the invicta series from the early eighties. If you can find a spot for it I bet youll enjoy it and if not let me know what sorta deal we can work out and meet halfway (which is probably around 600miles). Thanks,JB

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

5567 posts in 2065 days


#5 posted 01-17-2012 at 04:29 PM

Mine is made by Shopsmith and not nearly as heavy duty as yours. It has a 1 hp PC router in it now. I use it a lot for multiples of curved work. Wife and I made a batch of toy cars and trucks for our local toys for tots. I modified the plans so that one fender style fit every thing. Cut them all out on the OPR, 6 at a time.
Made 8 mirrors and 8 candy dishes for her siblings (big family!) for our last reunion. It came in handy then, too.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


#6 posted 01-17-2012 at 06:42 PM

BTW, I found machine searching my local craigslist business
section, not tools. The same seller had a behemoth 16” sliding
table saw for sale at a jawdropping low price… 3ph and super
heavy and all that, but a tank of a machine.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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doninvegas

332 posts in 1544 days


#7 posted 01-17-2012 at 07:16 PM

I have this.

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

View Loren's profile

Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


#8 posted 01-17-2012 at 07:21 PM

I had one of those Veritas steel router tables for several years. I really
liked it. I only sold it because I moved cross-country and didn’t work
wood for a couple of years.

How do you like the pin router arm?

It’s more like an Onsrud setup that way… you referenced the cutter
and the surface being cut on the same plane. With an overarm,
the reference surface is opposite the surface being routed, which
is good for some cuts and not so great for others.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View kizerpea's profile

kizerpea

746 posts in 1004 days


#9 posted 01-17-2012 at 09:56 PM

I have the shopsmith overarm 80s model proly use it once a month.. good machine for the $50 i have in it

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

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tom427cid

294 posts in 1108 days


#10 posted 01-18-2012 at 12:13 AM

I have a Stanley(mounts on the bench)-havn’t ever seen another-that was made to accept a portable router. Sorta looks like a drill press. It can be used as a pin router-pin mounts on the bottom. Currently I have it set up like a horizontal mill with a sliding table. I picked it up many years ago and only in the last couple of years did I start to use it. Wish I had had it many times before that. Now I use it fairly frequently.
tom

-- "certified sawdust maker"

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TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 992 days


#11 posted 01-18-2012 at 11:58 AM

I’ve used a couple different versions, but to be honest I can’t even remember why I had to use them. The applications were so few and so limited I mostly never went near those machines. And honestly, it can almost always be done another way just as well.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


#12 posted 01-18-2012 at 12:07 PM

I guess it depends a lot on the style of work you do. I don’t like
pattern routing with a full depth piloted cutter and the pin router
allows pattern cutting to be done in multiple passes. Even with
a shaper, more setup is required to cut out patterns in multiple
passes.

I used my smaller pin router lots for making router jigs. It was
a fast and intuitive way to do it. Custom guitar builders still
consider the pin router essential.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

5567 posts in 2065 days


#13 posted 01-18-2012 at 02:05 PM

I forgot to mention that it makes quick work of drilling shelf pin holes.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Loren

7464 posts in 2285 days


#14 posted 01-18-2012 at 03:39 PM

Gene, do you use some sort of jig for drilling the holes?

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 992 days


#15 posted 01-18-2012 at 08:21 PM

Gene, that’s done just as easily on a drill press. I’ve got a simple jig that one day I’ll remember to take pictures of to show for boring adjustable shelf holes, and even the european hinge borings.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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