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Forum topic by bilbaggins posted 01-16-2012 05:24 AM 1334 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


01-16-2012 05:24 AM

G’Day everyone!

Can anybody help me to shape wood edges with a large accurate roundover???

I don’t have a spindle shaper and/or a large 1/2” plus router—mine is 1/4” – 3/8” collet.

I want to put a large rounded edge on my guitar bodies so they are very smooth over the front to back edge. Radius is around 1” / 25mm.

Currently I make numerous passes with my router using a cove bit and a handmade guide. I simply keep moving the amount of bit that’s exposed and gradually get a roughly rounded edge. I then spend a lot of time hand sanding and shaping with superfine files.

This works but is very time consuming.

Any suggestions for a jig/s I can clamp to the edge to help do the same job??? Any sort of method would be very appreciated.

regards to all

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb


16 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112934 posts in 2329 days


#1 posted 01-16-2012 06:13 AM

you can draw a line on the side of your board a 1/2” down the side then use a a block plane to radius the edge and after that clean it up with a random orbital sander. It’s much easier to buy a 1/2” radius router bit.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#2 posted 01-16-2012 12:08 PM

Many thanks Jim!

I understand what you mean but that won’t reduce the work for me as much as I would like unfortunately.

Here’s a pic of what I did by router as describe above and the roundover style I wish to replicate on other body shapes.

NB body design copyright bilandersen 2012

I kinda know I’m just gonna have to save for a spindle or big router at some stage…

regards

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View Nighthawk's profile

Nighthawk

444 posts in 1108 days


#3 posted 01-16-2012 12:13 PM

Spoke shave (even a chisel to get into the corners) and lots of sanding… there is always lots of sanding..

time consuming yes… but the results of a hand craved item… mag-gical. lol

-- Rome wasn't built in a day... but I wasn't on that job? ... http://www.wackywoodworks.co.nz

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#4 posted 01-16-2012 12:28 PM

Thanks Nighthawk!

I love sharp spokeshaves!!! They feel so good peeling off the shavings…

You’re right about the chisels—I use them too and sharp knives to get into the crevices.

Lots of hand sanding… oh yeah… lots!

rgds

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View iltws2's profile

iltws2

25 posts in 1076 days


#5 posted 01-16-2012 01:06 PM

Make your body in two halves. make blanks wide, continue the curves beyond intersection point. Rout the edges. Rip blanks from inside point to inside point, then glue two halves together. Kinda like doing a mitre.

-- Medicaid Carpenter

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#6 posted 01-16-2012 11:24 PM

I like it !!! That’s a very sharp idea.

I have seen similar methods used on bodies made on carver duplicators.

But again, the size of the router bit ( 1/2” shank ) with a 1” + radius is my problem by the looks of it. If I had a big drill press I might be able to use that. Alas no.

Oh well I’ll just have to persevere with my small router.

many thanks all the same!

rgds

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11542 posts in 1442 days


#7 posted 01-17-2012 12:34 AM

I may not understand the question. But I use a 1/2” roundover bit in my small Ryobi router all the time with no problems. It is in my router table and I frequently make several progressive passes to minimize tearout. Obviously, a router bit is not going to work in those tight areas but otherwise a 1/2” roundover should work fine. Am I missing something here?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DannyB's profile

DannyB

46 posts in 2174 days


#8 posted 01-17-2012 02:38 AM

gfadvm:

He wants a 1” radius, not 1/2”.
It is very hard to find 1” radius roundover bits in 1/4” shank.
Even if you could, i would be very scared to use it :)

Bil:
I’d suggest making a molding plane, but they probably won’t be faster than your current method :)

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#9 posted 01-17-2012 03:23 AM

Thanks Danny!

Yer rite! the 1” bits a bit dangerous in the small router.

You’ve all made me think a bit harder! I may be close to a solution… am playing/working on a router jig idea that might work. At least to speed things up a bit. I’ll post sketches when it becomes a little clearer. Hopefully it will be of use to one and all!

thanks folks for all the input. Any more thoughts I’d still like to hear them.

regards

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View rum's profile

rum

148 posts in 1338 days


#10 posted 01-17-2012 08:21 AM

If you rough out the profile with a draw knife/shave first you could make a profile scraper to bring it to the finish shape. Similar to what DannyB was suggesting, but easier to make and would get into those odd corners maybe simpler. A good sharp profile scraper with a decent burr removes wood faster than you’d think and I’d bet a wooden nickle that its a heck of a lot faster than your current setup.

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#11 posted 01-17-2012 08:23 AM

Well I have worked out a template jig that should produce accurate oversize roundovers. Still trying to sort a way to make it adjustable etc…

Anyway here’s the sketch:

It’s pretty easy to make and can be tricked up to look flash! It’s just two U shaped pieces of wood or metal joined front and back to create a “sleeve” which carries and guides the router. The outside radius is calculated to suit the round over required.

To use it: the body/workpiece is clamped in a vise then the jig is slid over an edge then the router is inserted. It swivels front to back to carve the roundover. You just keep moving the jig along the edge. You need two hands altho the jig has clamps and an extra clamp over the whole affair would work OK too.

I’m likely to fix this to my workbench but have yet to puzzle that out!

I’ll build it in the next few days and post my findings…

rgds

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1107 days


#12 posted 01-17-2012 08:59 AM

Something about what you’re doing is sending up alot of red flags in my mind, I just don’t know why. Be very cautious.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#13 posted 01-17-2012 09:00 AM

Hi Rum!

Yes that’s a good idea.
I have been trying out various similar methods and use a scraper regularly for this kind of thing.

I’m really trying to improve the accuracy of the rounding ( to a pro level ) and seem to need to resort to mechanical means. I’m getting a bit old to make freehand bodies without flaws – which I don’t mind but buyers don’t like them for some reason!!!

Thanks again

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

590 posts in 1251 days


#14 posted 01-17-2012 03:42 PM

before sanding,

what about a beading scraper/scratch stock or a concave card scraper/cabinet scaper or a scrap shave?

numerous examples on this wonderful site:
scratch stock
http://lumberjocks.com/JasonD/blog/21906
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/31787
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/54817
http://lumberjocks.com/nobuckle/blog/25506
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/50362
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/48119
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29529

etc.
card scraper/cabinet scaper
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/7661
etc

scap shave/spoke shave
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/23016
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/43977
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/47113
etc

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View bilbaggins's profile

bilbaggins

98 posts in 1201 days


#15 posted 01-18-2012 01:32 AM

Brilliant input folks!!!

Thanks heaps everyone.

TCC is correct; this jig / contraption needs to be used with great care!
No doubt as I’m building it and trailing it there’ll be a few new dangers to consider. I anticipate only experienced router users will attempt to mess with this!!!

Thanks Sylvain for all the references. Great ideas there. I’m thinking of having some custom profiles card scrapers made up or maybe I’ll have a crack at making them.

Seem to spend lots n lots of time making time saving gadgets… is that some sort of oxymoron???

thanks again everyone

rgds

bilA

-- bilbaggins says: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. ~ Chinese proverb

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