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Forum topic by drfunk posted 01-14-2012 01:42 AM 1378 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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drfunk

223 posts in 2140 days


01-14-2012 01:42 AM

Topic tags/keywords: infill plane restoration evaporust clegg

Ok guys, I am back. So I think we have now determined that cleaning that old Clegg plane isn’t going to cause the world to end. Unfortunately there are little or no resources on the web (at least that I can find) about how to go about restoring an infill plane.

First off, let me define what I mean by restoring. I am a true minimalist – I clean, I polish, I lube, I protect – that’s about it.

So here’s my plan.

1 – Fully disassemble it.
2 – Clean wood parts and sole with mineral spirits and/or citrus cleaner and 0000 steel wool and/or shop rag.
3 – Put the rusty moving parts (screws) in Evaporust or equivalent.
4 – If mineral spirit scrub proves ineffective on sole – switch to Evaporust.

AFTER EVERYTHING IS CLEAN
1 – Polish all metal parts with Brasso or equivalent.
2 – Apply several coats of boiled linseed oil to wood infill.
3 – Reassemble and lube all moving parts.
4 – Polish with paste wax.

Does this sound like a good strategy? Never dealt with an infill before, so I don’t know what I am in for.


4 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2062 days


#1 posted 01-14-2012 04:27 AM

Good strategy? Why not? I want to see some after pics. That little plane looked pretty cool. Return that soldier to service. Cleaned, lubed and ready to shave.

View NateX's profile

NateX

95 posts in 2460 days


#2 posted 01-14-2012 06:05 AM

That plane looks really neat. I think your strategy is spot on, if those measures prove ineffective you could always step up to 600 grit sand paper on a granite tile.

I suppose you have to identify your goal here: Is this plane going to ever really be put into service again, or are you restoring it to part of a collection? If the latter is the case, I would say to take only the steps you outlined above. I’d bet you can get fine shavings even with said “minimalist interventions.”

Is there any sort of finish on the wooden parts?

What will you lube the moving parts with? I use 3 in 1 oil on my iron planes, but I imagine that would not work with wood so close to the metal

If you decide that you don’t like the plane or aren’t up to it, can I have it? Don’t worry, I’ll spring for shipping :-)

View adzdub's profile

adzdub

22 posts in 2688 days


#3 posted 01-14-2012 10:53 AM

Sounds good to me. In the end it’s a tool. It should be usable. Unless it is of historical importance. The great part is that you will be part of that tools history should it cary on to out live you. So if you think in your mind you’re doing something half hearted then stop. Otherwise your good to go.

-- ego sum quis ego sum

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2350 posts in 2460 days


#4 posted 01-14-2012 02:36 PM

I am still searching for “Clegg plane ” as well, to date haven’t found anything. I would also like to see pictures after you get it operating.
It is a cool old plane !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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