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Jatoba-the Darth Vader of Woods

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Forum topic by john8 posted 01-12-2012 10:33 PM 3058 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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john8

32 posts in 1796 days


01-12-2012 10:33 PM

I’m planning on gluing up a 7 foot by 17inch Jatoba raised bar counter. My plan is is to have an edge grain surface made by ripping either 6/4 or 8/4 rough lumber with a good glue line table saw blade. I will buy a used jointer to surface the face grain for gluing or pay a local shop to do it. Here are my questions.
1. I read that you should glue up quickly after ripping or planing to avoid twist,etc. If I’m cutting 60 linear feet of wood, is one sharp blade good enough or will I need reserve blades to finish all cutting at one time?
2. Would I be better off having a face grain surface and save less wear and tear on blades since I’d be doing less cutting? I was thinking an edge grain top would look better and be less prone to twist or warp but I’m a newbie. Any advice appreciated. I’d go with Americian cherry but I read that that is way too soft. I really like the red coloring of Jatoba.

-- john


8 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#1 posted 01-12-2012 10:40 PM

Face grain for me. Glue line blade is good. What glue will ya use? What’s the moisture reading? Less than 12%?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#2 posted 01-12-2012 10:53 PM

Unless you have a particularly poor blade or a blade that is already a little dull, you should have no problem running 60 linear feet through your table saw with a single blade.

If the wood is dry, you do not need to abnormally rushed to glue it up after ripping or planning. OTOH, I would not let is sit around for weeks after ripping or planning.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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john8

32 posts in 1796 days


#3 posted 01-13-2012 05:22 AM

Thanks Rich and Bill. I read some scary things about this wood. I’m glad to know that I have more than minutes to get the wood glued up after cutting. I’m hoping the place I buy the wood will have a moisture meter. I have read that Titebond 3 worked ok after wiping wood with acetone but I haven’t researched the glue part any further yet. Thanks for the advice. John

-- john

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horky

185 posts in 2395 days


#4 posted 01-13-2012 03:17 PM

This table is made from Jatoba. I used Titebond III for all joints. I left the boards stand for days to weeks before gluing and did not use acetone. No problems that I am yet aware of. Best of luck … and I cut way more than 60 linear feet, with a well used blade, and had no issues.

There is more info on the table in my blog should you care to read it. Hope this helps.

View Straightpiped's profile

Straightpiped

89 posts in 2956 days


#5 posted 01-16-2012 09:16 PM

I made my countertops out of 8/4 jatoba and glued them edge grain up. With glueup piece by piece it took me a week or so after I completed milling. There was zero warping and twisting. If you havn’t worked jatoba before, it is extremely hard. One of the hardest woods available.

-- T. Nelson

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john8

32 posts in 1796 days


#6 posted 01-16-2012 10:56 PM

Thanks for your information. That’s gives me more confidence in tackling this. I found a supplier of the 8/4 lumber a few hours from here in San Francisco. Do you have any advice on surfacing the boards? I’m either going to get a
small benchtop planer and separate 6 inch jointer or a combo 8 inch jointer planer. Other options are hand jointer planes which can be pricey also or just taking it to a mill and paying the 90$ an hour plus set up fees. I think I like the edge grain up also. I had been viewing hte photos on the Devos website and they are beautiful like yours. I like your stairstep design at the 90 degree interface. Thanks again, John

-- john

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Straightpiped

89 posts in 2956 days


#7 posted 01-20-2012 08:29 PM

John, what I did was this… I bought 12’ lenths of rough sawn 8/4 Jatoba and picked as square and flat as I could. Then prior to milling I actually ripped them on the table saw in 1-1/4” thick strips. I than milled the glue edges, face grain in my case, through the jointer and planer to the same thickness. I didn’t spend a whole lot of time milling the face and underside because I knew I would be doing more of it after glue-up. After glue up was complete I spent quite a bit of time with the hand planes getting it nice and flat.

-- T. Nelson

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john8

32 posts in 1796 days


#8 posted 01-20-2012 09:21 PM

Thanks again T, I can see my tool collection increasing. I don’t think I can avoid getting a few planes in addition to my Jack plane. I’ll probably pay someone to do the initial planing and then hand plane the finished product. Never having done a glue up besides the high school chess board, it doesn’t sound like there is away to glue it in flat alignment to avoid the final planing. I’ve even considered just jointing the glued edges, gluing it up and sending the whole 17inch by 7 foot piece to the mill for final planing. Thanks T

-- john

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