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D55146 Dewalt compressor, not a quality product, my opinion.

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Forum topic by , posted 01-12-2012 04:10 AM 9658 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


01-12-2012 04:10 AM

I bought this compressor new about 14 months ago. I rely on my equipment to help me provide for my family. I needed a decent unit that was portable enough to take to the job site. When I first bought the unit it would build to 200 PSI quick. It appeared to be the perfect fit for my situation/budget.

Well, this past December, both quick disconnect fittings on the unit began leaking badly. I know that is a wear and tear deal, so I did not give it much thought, although both went bad at the same time. Then only 2 weeks after replacing the disconnects, the stock regulator began leaking terribly. The regulator was releasing air out of it as quick as the compressor could provide air. I thought that to be odd but I went ahead and replaced the regulator. So then everything was great again. Then a couple weeks ago the compressor lost the ability to build pressure to 200 PSI, so the pressure switch would not turn the motor off, causing the unit to run without building past about 142 PSI. So I took the housing apart. I observed the armature and a set of brushes. I also observed only one of the two brushes is sparking. I did not find any adjustment on the brushes and everything appears connected fine, but the one brush does not spark at all.

So now I will need to buy a new set of brushes off of ereplacements.com. The cost will be minimal. Maybe I am exagerating my complaining about this 349.00 unit, but for all of these parts to go bad at 13 and 14 months old, it seems a good quality Dewalt product should last at least 2 to 3 years without having to replace stock parts. And, after removing the larger plastic housing that covers the motor and pump, I was surprised to see just how small the tiny little motor is. The motor looks like little petite motor you might find in a toy.

I don’t think this was a good buy. I am now in the market for another air compressor to serve as either a back up or primary. When budget permits I intend on purchasing a larger 80 gallon unit with at least 18 cfm + output. But I don’t have that budget at this time.

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13 replies so far

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#1 posted 01-18-2012 04:03 AM

well I am getting ready to order new brushes for my dewalt compressor. It should be as good as new soon! I am in the market for a back up compressor.

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Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#2 posted 01-18-2012 04:54 AM

Forgive my ignorance, but why do you need 200 psi for woodworking?

Is there a chance that pushing the compressor to high pressures
contributed to the wear?

I don’t use air for much, admittedly. I mostly run nailers and blow up
tires.

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#3 posted 01-18-2012 05:03 AM

I am not sure that 200 PSI is necessary for anything I am aware of in woodworking. It is just that with the Dewalt compressor I own it is rated for the 200 PSI spec and the pressure switch is set from factory to allow the motor and pump to build pressure until 200 PSI is registered. One thing I have done to help things out is adjust the pressure switch down, so now the motor turns on at 80 PSI and shuts off at 120 PSI.

It is just a factory spec but likely not needed. I just recognized Dewalt as a quality manufacturer but they missed the mark with this compressor in my opinion.

-- .

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#4 posted 01-18-2012 05:04 AM

I am not sure that 200 PSI is necessary for anything I am aware of in woodworking. It is just that with the Dewalt compressor I own it is rated for the 200 PSI spec and the pressure switch is set from factory to allow the motor and pump to build pressure until 200 PSI is registered. One thing I have done to help things out is adjust the pressure switch down, so now the motor turns on at 80 PSI and shuts off at 120 PSI.

It is just a factory spec but likely not needed. I just recognized Dewalt as a quality manufacturer but they missed the mark with this compressor in my opinion.

-- .

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Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#5 posted 01-18-2012 05:08 AM

Next time look at getting an oil-lubed compressors. That’s
what I’ve used for years. I’ve avoided oil-less because they
are noisier, mostly. Allegedly they are not as long-lasting.

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3023 days


#6 posted 01-18-2012 01:10 PM

The idea is that 200 psi will lower the duty cycle of the compressor – i.e. the motor will run less frequent. Also allows you to pump it up, unplug it, and use it (for awhile) where there is no power.

-- Joe

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Cato

693 posts in 2775 days


#7 posted 01-18-2012 01:59 PM

I have had this compressor for several years and have been really happy with this unit. Runs every nailer I have and never any loss of air even when toe nailing with the framer.

Sorry you had such problems with yours, nature of the beast with equipment, but I believe that it came with a 3 year warranty so you should let Dewalt fix it.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4450 posts in 3422 days


#8 posted 01-18-2012 06:01 PM

I’ve had my PC pancake since 2001. Trimmed 2 houses and steady shop use. I blow it down after each use to get rid of moisture. Darned thing won’t die. BUT WAIT…..........I shouldn’t say that. It might not start up next time. I also have a Craftsman oiled twin cylinder that I bought in 1978. That’s when you could get some good stuff a Sears.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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KenBry

470 posts in 1909 days


#9 posted 01-18-2012 09:46 PM

Have you contacted Dewalt Customer service? I have had good luck with them when I have a issue with a tool going south. Mind you I only needed to contact them once :)

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#10 posted 01-19-2012 06:01 AM

I will give customer service a call. It is just that recently I have been very busy, working late Monday through Saturday. I have looked on Dewalt’s web site for a customer service email address but did not find one. I guess I will have to try and call them during the daytime. In the meantime I am purchasing the new brushes online at ereplacements.com. Thanks for all of the feedback guys.

-- .

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derosa

1568 posts in 2298 days


#11 posted 01-19-2012 06:15 AM

I also dislike this compressor a lot. I first bought a cheap double tank compressor with two nail gun kit from HD for 100.00 on sale; I prefer the cheap compressor to the dewalt which I gave to my dad to get rid of. The smaller one was a lot quieter and does most jobs more then adequately. I thought with the high compression and decent cfm rating it would be decent for spray jobs. It isn’t, it just doesn’t keep up at all once things get spraying but is too big and clunky to use as a portable tool. If you need portability get something smaller and if you need capacity get something bigger that doesn’t pretend to be portable. Although my brushes haven’t given up, it has always had a slight seal leak which has only mattered when it sits over 24hrs and one wheel broke quickly.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#12 posted 01-19-2012 06:25 AM

yeah, I agree Russ. I just did not expect bad quality from Dewalt, that is what has surprised me. For a hobbyist usage I bet it would be fine, but it has not stood up to what a contractor like myself needs. I might expect these issues with a 100.00 unit, or other knock off brand. But this unit cost near 400.00 with taxes. Very dissapointing. I will adventually get an 80 gallon unit, probably a Inger Sol Rand, but not sure yet. I prefer 18 to 28 CFM output on the future upgrade. At this time I am in the market for a dual tank oiled pump unit. Ridgid, Makita, Rol-Air, Ingersol Rand and others make these dual tank units. I think a dual tank unit with 4-5 CFM output will be perfect for us as a back up type.

I do like the wheel barrow style structure the Dewalt unit has.

-- .

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#13 posted 01-19-2012 06:47 AM

yeah, I agree Russ. I just did not expect bad quality from Dewalt, that is what has surprised me. For a hobbyist usage I bet it would be fine, but it has not stood up to what a contractor like myself needs. I might expect these issues with a 100.00 unit, or other knock off brand. But this unit cost near 400.00 with taxes. Very dissapointing. I will adventually get an 80 gallon unit, probably a Inger Sol Rand, but not sure yet. I prefer 18 to 28 CFM output on the future upgrade. At this time I am in the market for a dual tank oiled pump unit. Ridgid, Makita, Rol-Air, Ingersol Rand and others make these dual tank units. I think a dual tank unit with 4-5 CFM output will be perfect for us as a back up type.

I do like the wheel barrow style structure the Dewalt unit has.

-- .

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