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Table Tops with Edging

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Forum topic by Bill Rickvalsky posted 01-09-2012 11:42 PM 2801 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bill Rickvalsky

23 posts in 1876 days


01-09-2012 11:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

I am in the process of researching a design for a dining/kitchen table. I’ve spent a lot of time looking at table projects on here. There are some beautiful table tops on some of these projects that have contrasting edges around the perimeter of the top. But it is not always obvious how the construction was done.

I am particularly curious about how this edging is done on tables with glued up tops and the handling of wood movement. I know how it is handled with fairly simple breadboard ends. But some of the tables have edging which seems to be rather finely fitted and finished. It would seem that any expansion and contraction would result spaces and gaps that detract from the appearance of these tables.

How is the edging attached to these tables? Or do they using veneered plywood for such projects to avoid dealing with movement? Maybe solid hardwood glue ups limit what you can do with edge treatment. Any insights would appreciated.

-- Bill--Genuine, verified, certified, card carrying amateur at just about everything.


5 replies so far

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bandit571

14625 posts in 2150 days


#1 posted 01-10-2012 12:00 AM

I have a table I have to build in a few weeks. It will have a 48” x 48” plywood “center” , 3/4” thick. Thinking of slotting the edge of the plywood, say about 1/4” by 3/4 ” deep. Edge stock will be 4/4 oak. I may have the “extra” lip back under the plywood panel. Then a few screws can be added from underneath. Maybe some mitered corners, OR, maybe round the outside edges into a curve, so that very little is at the corners. Edging will be about 4” wide.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Bill Rickvalsky

23 posts in 1876 days


#2 posted 01-10-2012 12:32 AM

I can see where putting edging around a plywood table top can be done by several different approaches. I guess what I am trying to find out is if plywood with a veneer is the only way to go or can a glued up hardwood table top also get edging added beyond just simple breadboard ends.

-- Bill--Genuine, verified, certified, card carrying amateur at just about everything.

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bandit571

14625 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 01-10-2012 12:44 AM

Depends on the wood used. However, one needs to allow hardwood table tops a way to move. I’m sitting at a computer desk that has a nice, 1/8’ split, right down the middle. Come june, july, august, the split will close back up.

Much easier for the bigger tops IF the “core” is a plywood . Some wood you can glue up into a solid top. But, when one adds edging, stuff happens. One could make the edging “float” along with the top, using a “gap” between the edge and the field of the top. A champfer bit, run along this gap, would help hide/define (depends on the look you are after) the gap. A floating tenon between the top would work. A dowel pin could help keep the edging centered on the field.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Bill Rickvalsky

23 posts in 1876 days


#4 posted 01-10-2012 03:34 AM

I guess maybe those projects I saw with any edging around the full perimeter must have used a field which is made of hardwood veneer plywood. Since I have not yet decided on exactly what I am going to build I’ll have to take this into consideration as part of my decision. Part of me wanted to go with a solid hardwood glue up. But who knows what I will finally wind up with.

-- Bill--Genuine, verified, certified, card carrying amateur at just about everything.

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DLCW

530 posts in 2121 days


#5 posted 01-10-2012 04:24 AM

Your best bet for this type of table top is to use an MDF core and veneer it top and bottom. Then add your contrasting edging. The MDF and veneer will not expand and contract. I did a 20’ long by 5’ wide oval shaped conference table with 1” MDF core, veneered both sides with quarter sawn white oak and edge banded with walnut. It worked very well and the customer was very pleased with the results.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

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