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What type of moisture meter?

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Forum topic by yellowtruck75 posted 01-09-2012 06:30 PM 1071 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yellowtruck75

464 posts in 2533 days


01-09-2012 06:30 PM

I am interested in getting a moisture meter but have no idea what I am looking for and which ones are accurate.


6 replies so far

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Bill Davis

226 posts in 3390 days


#1 posted 01-09-2012 06:43 PM

There is an easy answer. Get this or that make and model. But I suggest you look through some of the fine articles dealing with this very subject at woodweb.
http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/search/search.cgi?Realm=All&Terms=moisture+meters#reference

I’m sure you will get good recommendations from users but read the above anyway.

I’ve got a Extech 407777 and would not recommend it. Maybe some of their newer ones are more reliable.

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#2 posted 01-09-2012 06:49 PM

I have a mini ligno. It is old-fashioned tech but it works. It is
still available new so that says something. It has pins you stick
in the wood.

In a pinch you can gauge dryness by holding the soft skin of
your forearm against the board. If it feels cold when the environment
around it is warm, it is not dry enough for furniture.

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yellowtruck75

464 posts in 2533 days


#3 posted 01-09-2012 07:52 PM

Do you take your meter to the mill to check lumber before purchasing?

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#4 posted 01-09-2012 07:55 PM

I usually buy kiln-dried lumber for furniture from a hardwoods
dealer. Moisture checking at the yard isn’t necessary if the
wood is kiln dried in my experience.

You may have better regional sources of green wood off the
mill you can take home and dry yourself. In my area, that
isn’t an option.

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Bill Davis

226 posts in 3390 days


#5 posted 01-09-2012 09:13 PM

But lumber that has been kiln dried does not remain at the kiln dried moisture content unless it is kept at it’s equilibrium relative humidity. That is why every woodworker needs to have a moisture meter.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2159 days


#6 posted 01-09-2012 09:22 PM

I’ve got an El Cheapo from a big box store. It seems to get the same readings (within 0.5 or so) of my friend’s expensive one. I think General makes mine.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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