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Adding a power switch to a tablesaw

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Forum topic by Tyrone D posted 01-08-2012 12:53 PM 6708 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1028 days


01-08-2012 12:53 PM

Hello,
I have a Delta QT-10 Contractor saw which I am modifying. One of the necessary modification is a push-button power switch. Currently it has a breaker which is on the base of the saw and on the wrong side of the saw. It is very difficult to turn it on and off which makes it very unsafe.

My question is on the wiring. I’ve bought two switches, one is a latching Emergency Stop Switch and the other is a push button switch. They are both rated at 125V 6A.
My plan was to keep the breaker and just put my new switch between the breaker and the motor.
I know enough about electronics to know what you’re talking about. I can read schematics and have done a few repairs and modifications to audio equipment.

Does anyone have any links, schematics or comments on the topic? It would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
—Tyrone

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."


9 replies so far

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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1028 days


#1 posted 01-08-2012 03:01 PM

Doing some research on the matter, I’ve found a much easier and better way to do it. Grizzly sells switches which fit in a standard electrical box. These have the paddle and the on switch is already recessed. The Grizzly switch is actually cheaper than the two I purchased. Luckily I have them in the original packaging and I still have the receipt.

I’m going to buy the non-paddle version for my Bandsaw as well.

Switch link: http://www.grizzly.com/products/110-220V-Paddle-On-Off-Switch/H8243

—Tyrone

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

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tenontim

2131 posts in 2439 days


#2 posted 01-08-2012 03:26 PM

+1 Tyrone’s link. The 6 amp switches you have will go up in smoke if you use them on a table saw.

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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1028 days


#3 posted 01-08-2012 09:58 PM

That’s what I was worrying about. In audio electronics I’ve never done anything involving the amperage of a switch.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

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Clouseau

34 posts in 1728 days


#4 posted 01-09-2012 01:25 AM

I buy the 220v paddle switch from Grizzly and just use one side for 110v. If you ever burn the contacts on that side, just switch to the other. If you change to 220 later, you already have a switch. You could also add a plug for your vdc to the unused side, but it might overload your breaker. It has to be mounted in a 4×4 box with a (5/8”) plaster ring. While your at it, you might want to add a set of plugs between the switch and motor. You usually need to remove the motor from most contractor saws to get them through a door. No sense rewiring all the time.

-- Dan Coleman, retired Welding Inspector and past IA Teacher

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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1028 days


#5 posted 01-09-2012 07:06 AM

Clouseau, I don’t think it has to be mounted in a 4×4 box as I have seen the same switch mounted in a standard single box. My saw is also direct drive no matter how much I wish it wasn’t.
—Tyrone

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

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Clouseau

34 posts in 1728 days


#6 posted 01-09-2012 02:33 PM

I think the H8243 is the one I use. I went through every box the hardware store had and took it to an electrician friend, and that was the only optinion we came up with. One neat option is you can mount it to the bottom of a Unifence rail with just a nipple and lock nuts. The rail is already drilled and tapped.

-- Dan Coleman, retired Welding Inspector and past IA Teacher

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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1028 days


#7 posted 01-10-2012 01:48 AM

Judging by the pictures of it, it looks like the ground connector in a regular box might get in the way. I’ll find out when it gets here.
—Tyrone

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

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jlasersmith

45 posts in 847 days


#8 posted 08-13-2012 06:19 PM

Tyrone, I have an older delta contractors saw and am trying to replace the switch with a paddle style switch. the problem I ran into is there are only a black, white, and green wires connecting the old switch. the new one I bought requires 4 wires.
Did you have the same problem? If so, how did you hook up your switch?
thanks,
Jeremy

-- I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different. -Kurt Vonnegut

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thenetdog

7 posts in 955 days


#9 posted 08-14-2012 03:34 PM

Jeremy,
This is an old thread but I think I know what you are asking. The paddle switches have four screws so that you can have two hots come from the line side, and two hots go to the motor on the load side. The green ground is conencted to a bare spot on the saw, usually there is a screw in the motor for it. The if you are running 120v the white does not go through the switch and is connected from the cord straight to the motor and the black hot connects through one pair of the switch screws. If you are using 220v then both the black and white/red are hot so connect both from the cord to one side of the switch, and then two hots to the motor from the other side. It sounds like you are using 120v so you only need to run the black through the switch.
Bob

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