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Hybrid versus contractor table saw

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Forum topic by b2rtch posted 01-07-2012 02:19 AM 6744 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2513 days


01-07-2012 02:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

I just received my copy of Popular Woodworking.
On the inside cover Grizzly advertizes both for an hybrid table saw and a contractor table saw.
Both are at exactly the same price and the hybrid has a more powerful motor.
What do I miss?
Why anyone one in his/her right mind would buy the contractor saw?
Please explain to me.
Thanks Bert

-- Bert


13 replies so far

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2140 days


#1 posted 01-07-2012 02:31 AM

The contractor saw would be lighter to move if you took it to a job site…like a contractor would do. I read in a Grizzly ad a month or so ago that they would have a price increase in 2012. Maybe the contractor saw is new and the hybrid is old stock…..I can’t tell you anything for sure.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#2 posted 01-07-2012 02:51 AM

A traditional full size contractor saw had a belt drive induction motor hanging off the back for easy removal and easier transit. It was based on a 60 year old design that’s not seen much in new saws these days because portable jobsite saws have pretty much replaced them in the field. The design trend has been towards hybrids with the motor inside the cabinet in recent years, because most folks no longer move stationary saws from site to site anymore. That traditional contractor saw design is essentially obsolete, and there are very few being manufactured with the old outboard motor design.

There’s really no standard definition of what constitutes a contractor saw or a hybrid saw, and the distinction between the two is heavily blurred….some have full enclosures, some have 3/4 enclosures, some have half enclosures and open stands, some have cabinet mounted trunnions, some have table mounted trunnions. It looks to me like many companies are marketing full size 1-1/2 to 2hp stationary belt drive saws that have open splayed leg stands as “contractor saws”, even though some would consider these hybrids due to the interior location of the motor. Many would call the same saw a hybrid if it were in a full enclosure. At least that’s my take on it anyway.

I’ll hazard a guess that what you spotted as a contractor saw, is really a modern “hybrid” style contractor saw with an inboard belt drive motor.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#3 posted 01-07-2012 03:03 AM

Contractor saws probably evolved from old jack-shaft compatible designs,
and many old cabinet saws from the 1940s and before had the motor
hanging out the back. The difference is that on these older saws
the belt actually twists when the arbor is tilted, and the motor slides
a bit on a track.

Anyway, the contractor saws are an old fashioned design and to
some extent they were designed as modular saws where you could
provide your own motor.

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2513 days


#4 posted 01-07-2012 03:38 AM

So my question is : why someone buy a contractor saw when he/she can buy an hybrid for the the same money?
Someone answered portability.

-- Bert

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#5 posted 01-07-2012 04:20 AM

Because the low end “Hybrid” saws are notoriously weak in structural strength attributes, while the older design contractor saws are generally more sturdy. At least that’s my opinion based on my low end Hybrid.

If I had known how flimsy my saw was designed I might have gone for the contractor saw as an entry level saw, or held out for a better hybrid or cabinet saw from Craig’s List.

But, my opinion is based on the Craftsman 21833, same as the Ridgid 4512, and the Porter Cable Hitachi twins recently sold by Lowes. These saws are what you get at around $500 these days. I don’t know if the Grizzly entry level Hybrid is in the same class or not.

I suspect there are not many, if any, of the older, rear motor contractor saws with a riving knife and that was a strong influence on my decision to go hybrid. And I still would not want a saw without one unless it was a super deal for some old heavy iron.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#6 posted 01-07-2012 04:37 AM

Contractor saws and hybrids both have the trunnions
mounted to the table. In the cabinet saws the trunnions
are heavier and mounted to the cabinet.

That said, I had an INCA 2200 and the trunnions were
modest in size and mounted to the table. The saw was
a very fine machine.

It is news to me that the hybrids are lower build quality than
the contractor saws. If only for dust collection, the hybrid
is a more appealing machine to me.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2140 days


#7 posted 01-07-2012 06:18 AM

It was based on a 60 year old design that’s not seen much in new saws these days because portable jobsite saws have pretty much replaced them in the field.
I know people that still move the contractor saw sometimes daily. with that said by removing the motor you remove….75 lbs? I think there was a post a few days ago and Scott commented on it. It was about a hybrid with the trunnions mounted on the cabinet. I am not sure who built it but I was thinking it was a Grizzly. I don’t know. I will say that I don’t care for the little counter top job site saws. They are one step above using a saber saw for finer work even in constructing homes. So back to the question….why buy a contractor saw…well if you never move it then I wouldn’t get one. If I moved it often I would have to rethink that decision.

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Rick Dennington

5179 posts in 2659 days


#8 posted 01-07-2012 07:05 AM

I actually have 2 saws…..an old Craftsman contractor built in about 1984-85 that I completely refurbished and built a cabinet for, and a 2009 Unisaw. When I was going to upgrade to the cabinet saw, I never even considered the hybrid, because the cabinet saw was so much more of a power house. I bought the 5 hp. w/ 52” Biesmeyer fence and outfeed tables right and left….this is what I wanted and the hybrids didn’t hold a candle to these saws…so for a few extra $$$$, I got a beast….I call it the “Frankinsaw”, cause it’s scary…lol.

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#9 posted 01-07-2012 04:53 PM

I don’t fully understand the differences, but Grizzly has been selling their regular line of products and a, recently introduced, Polar Bear line. The Polar Bear products are a little cheaper and are characterized by being white, as opposed to green.

In the ad that you are referencing, the hybrid is definitely from the Polar Bear line. I think (but I am not 100% certain) that the contractor’s saw is from the regular line. I say that because the legs are green. I’m not 100% certain because the “box” is white.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#10 posted 01-07-2012 05:05 PM

I think there was a post a few days ago and Scott commented on it. It was about a hybrid with the trunnions mounted on the cabinet. I am not sure who built it but I was thinking it was a Grizzly.

Steel City/Orion is best known for what I define as a “hybrid saw” with cabinet mounted trunnions. They made the first three Craftsman “zipcode” saws – 22104, 22114, 22124, they make the current 22116, the former Ridgid R4511, several of their own models – former 35605, 35610, current 35900, 35925, 35950, 35990 (billed as a contractor saw due to it’s open leg stand), a few models for Duracraft, and others. I believe they also have a hand in the GI 50-240GT but am not certain. The new Porter Cable PCB270TS sports cabinet mounted trunnions in theory, but they’re not the large yoke style trunnions like those on most industrial saws and the SC/Orion hybrids.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#11 posted 01-08-2012 12:57 AM

Yes, the Steel City/Orion with the cabinet mounted trunions is what I meant by holding out for the higher end hybrid saw versus the low end like mine. They only cost a couple hundred more, but are much better machines. Of course the used true cabinet saws fall into the same price range, $750+, and are worth consideration.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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mrg

659 posts in 2464 days


#12 posted 01-08-2012 03:02 AM

The contractor is a new saw and is less than the other tcontractor saws. The other contractor saws are $895 and have a better fence and 1.75 hp and 2 hp motors. That being said the contractor saw you are paying the premium for the Grizzly name and portability. The hybrid is a Polar Bear. If you look at the two other contractor saws and the Polar Bear you are on a more level playing field. The two saws in the ad the hybrid hands down. The other way depends on wants and preferences. T.he lower priced Grizzly looks to be going after the PC saw .

-- mrg

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#13 posted 01-08-2012 04:54 AM

After reading mrg’s post, I perused the Grizzly website and noted the “New” contractor saw – G0732 for $795 (+$99s/h, $894 delivered)...it’s got an open splayed leg stand, stamped steel wings, and a cheapo aluminum fence. It’s the exact same price as the G0715P hybrid with a full enclosure, solid cast iron wings, and steel Biese clone fence. I think I see what Bert’s getting at if that’s the saw he spotted. Why on earth would anyone buy the G0732 for even money over the G0715P? (....and it has an internal motor that doesn’t remove easily like the old style contractor saws).

Usually Grizzly offers more value for the money than other brands that have dealer support, but this saw is more than $300 more than a comparably outfitted Ridgid 4512, Craftsman 21833, and Porter Cable CPB270TS. Makes me wonder if it’s a typo. Who’d pay $900 for that?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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