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Forum topic by devann posted 01-03-2012 10:35 PM 1097 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


01-03-2012 10:35 PM

Hello LJs, I’m looking for some advice. I needed a piece of wood the other day and when I went to my storage for a board this is what I found. I needed some pine, a short piece, so I pulled these out but couldn’t use them due to the sap/pitch that was oozing from them.
I’d still like to someday use these boards without cutting them down for something smaller. Is there any way to clean the sap from the boards and stop it from oozing or are these just a couple pieces of firewood?

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with


6 replies so far

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fussy

980 posts in 2517 days


#1 posted 01-03-2012 11:23 PM

You can clean the pitch off with mineral spirits or turpentine and sone elbow grease, I think. To stop it, use shellac (Zinser’s Seal Coat).

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2267 days


#2 posted 01-03-2012 11:43 PM

Looks like some nice clear pine if you can get the sap to stop!

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#3 posted 01-04-2012 01:25 AM

I’d like to know how you season the pitch out of pine and fir?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#4 posted 01-04-2012 04:06 AM

TopamaxSurvivor,

Actually, you don’t season the pitch OUT of the wood. Instead you use higher temperatures during the last phases of the drying process to drive out the liquid volitiles (sp?) that make the pitch “runny” at the lower temperatures. The temperature must be maintained for approximately 24 hours to “set” the pitch. The pitch is left behind in the wood but will not “flow” because the liquid volities are not present. But if the ambient temperature reaches the max temperature used in the drying process then the pitch will “flow” again.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#5 posted 01-04-2012 06:21 AM

What kind of temps are you talking about to set it in normal processes?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1821 days


#6 posted 01-04-2012 07:22 AM

The funny thing is, it might have only been one of the boards. You would be surprised at the numbers and types of woods that can leak “wood oils” out even when properly kiln dried. I’ve seen one “oily” board seep out onto several before. But it’s not biggy, you’ve obviously been letting these boards acclimate, which is another word for season. All you should really need to do is clean or sand it away, then finish it.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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