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question about bowtie inlay

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Forum topic by sarahss posted 01-03-2012 05:57 PM 1631 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sarahss

254 posts in 1303 days


01-03-2012 05:57 PM

I’m trying to learn to use the router inlay kit and want to inlay a bowtie of one species into another species of wood. What is the correct way to orient the grain of the inlaid piece? Should the grain run parallel with the piece receiving the inlay or perpindicular to it?


9 replies so far

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saddletramp

994 posts in 1291 days


#1 posted 01-03-2012 05:59 PM

If you are using the bowtie to strenghten a crack or split, then the grain should run perpendicular.

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2302 days


#2 posted 01-03-2012 06:08 PM

regardless of how the grain is oriented between the tie and the pieces it is inlayed into it, the grain in the bowtie itself should run long way. (if the tie is oriented like a this >< then the grain should be like this—- and not like this |||) this is so that the bowtie will not break in half and so that it will actually have structural strength to hold things together.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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sarahss

254 posts in 1303 days


#3 posted 01-03-2012 06:14 PM

thanks guys!

Bob—if it is just decorative, does it matter?

Purplev—I see what you mean—that makes sense to me

Hopefully, I’ll get to try it this week or weekend!!

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saddletramp

994 posts in 1291 days


#4 posted 01-03-2012 06:32 PM

Sarah, if it is purely decorative then from a structural standpoint it would make no difference but, the main purpose of a bowtie is to strengthen a crack or split so, even if it is decorative only, I would go perpendicular to give the appearance of structural improvement.

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

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Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#5 posted 01-04-2012 04:12 PM

It Is basically an inlay-ed dovetail.

I held my bench legs together with them.
They are great for covering inclusions.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#6 posted 01-04-2012 04:15 PM

If it is strictly decorative, grain orientation is not an issue.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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sarahss

254 posts in 1303 days


#7 posted 01-04-2012 04:28 PM

thanks for all the help—hubby has an idea for using them as a decorative element in a skirt for our staircase—should be exciting and I’ll hopefully have something actually finished to post soon…...

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tbone

256 posts in 2338 days


#8 posted 01-05-2012 01:49 AM

Sarah, Charlie’s right of course. But I think that I’d orient them perpendicular to the grain even though it’s just decorative. It will give the impression that they are structural and are actually doing the job that they were designed to do. (It might seem more authentic, but that’s just me)

-- Kinky Friedman on gay marriage: "They should have the right to be just as miserable as the rest of us."

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CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#9 posted 01-05-2012 02:54 AM

I agree with tbone.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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