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Need Advice on Ripping 1/4in Planks from 8 1/2in Wide 8/4 White Ash

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Forum topic by HorizontalMike posted 968 days ago 1185 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


968 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: barristers bookcase bookcase ripping

BACKGROUND: I have nearly all the hardwood cut for my Barrister Bookcase Project (Wood Magazine #21 Feb 1988, pp 66-71) other than the base and top pieces. For those I am choosing to make the base and top much closer to the June/July 2003 article in Wood Mag. I have a copy of the 1988 mag but NOT of the 2003 issue, however it looks like I can wing it from the original 1988 issue.

Anyway, I am planning on replacing all pieces that call for “1/4in oak plywood” with 1/4—3/8in ripped White Ash. I have a couple of boards that are 8 1/2in wide with which I want to do the ripping. These are already jointed and planed and ready for my 14in Rikon BS.

QUESTIONS:

1. Would it be better to wait until right before I do the assembly to rip these thin panels, or can I keep them from warping if I rip them now?

2. I also want to be able to join them to make long panels ~35in long with grain running up/down for the back sides and grain running length wise for the bottom panels. All panels will reside in Dado’d frames. Should I just loose fit the multiple 1/4in planks with butt jointed edges, or glue them together and THEN fit them into the frames?

3. Just how thin can I get away with planing these 1/4in thick panels? I have the Ridgid 13in planer.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."


19 replies so far

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1319 days


#1 posted 968 days ago

question #

1. I’d wait

2. Glue ‘em

3. yes

looking forward to seeing it when finished.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1161 posts in 1486 days


#2 posted 968 days ago

Make a shiplap joint for each plank in the back panel. Do not glue it up. Attach each plank with one small brad in the center of each end and/or in a groove in the back frame. The large panel will expand/contract across whole width of panel while individual planks will move less individually and the shiplap will conceal the movement.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

398 posts in 1821 days


#3 posted 968 days ago

Mike, I’ve planed wood down to just a hair over 1/8” with my Ridgid planer. 1/4” has never been a problem.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112011 posts in 2204 days


#4 posted 968 days ago

Mike I would use plywood it’s much more stable as far as wood movement is concerned. If you feel you must use solid wood I would resaw and plane and assemble the panels all in one day ,if you can’t, put the panels in a plastic bag to keep the moisture content equal until you can glue up the panels and install them in their frames. It seems like your talking about butt joints for the frames? I would use some dowels or biscuits or even better mortise an tenon joinery for the frames.
Make your panels 1/8”-3/16 smaller than the inside measurement of your grooves in the frames . A 1/4” should not be a problem for your planner.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#5 posted 968 days ago

Well Jim, I WAS going to complain about the price of these hardwood plywoods since I had seen at least one online site that wanted +$75/sh and higher. But then I thought I would check one more time locally and managed to find White Ash $25.50/sh, White Oak $26.50, and Red Oak @ $18.97/sh.

Boy am I glad you brought this up! This will simplify things considerably. Jeff, Herb and Darrell all had my back though with some good info, but still not sure if my talents are quite there yet. I might give the ripping a try on the next one or so. I am wanting to build at least three or four of these 3-high bookcases eventually. Remember that WW magazine/book goldmine I ran into last summer? They need a good home in which to reside. 8-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1678 days


#6 posted 968 days ago

Mike,

If the wood is well aqclimated to your shop, I see no reason to wait. I just resawed sapele into 1/8” thick slices, and as they needed to be 10” wide instead of my saw’s 6” capacity, I bookmatched and edge-glued them together. Out of 4 of sapele and 1 of red mahoe, in a unheated garage for 2 weeks, nary a warp or twist. As to making them longer (talking about glueing end-to-end?), I’d do a half-lap at the ends about 1/2” in from the ends, and glue up planks as long as you want. I stretched 12’ baseboard to a single 40’ piece for a church in my younger days. Worked fine. The half-lap gives a good bit of long grain glue area. Last, I didn’t hesitate to take my stock right down to 1/8”, so 1/4” is no problem. Stretch that wood.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#7 posted 968 days ago

OK here is where I stand today with the Barrister’s Bookcase. Nice to leave the politics/religion out of the shop sometimes:

Steve, the wood I have used for this project, has been IN the shop for over a year. Just got another 50BF from the girl friend so things are looking up! 8-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1678 days


#8 posted 968 days ago

You’ve been a busy little beaver. I like ash. I have a piece 12/4×7” x 10 feet I biught 5 years ago green. I could barely get it out of the truck. It’s beenb drying that long, but I can’t get it off the rack. I guess I’m getting old.
Nice, organized work.
No politics or religion, how about sex and rock ‘n roll or Norton 750’s or KZ900’s?

ASteve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10724 posts in 1317 days


#9 posted 968 days ago

Mike, I hope Jim convinced you to use the ply rather than solid. You will be much happier in the long run, not to mention the easier aspect. For the record I have planed to 7/64 with my Ridgid planer (no problems).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View derosa's profile

derosa

1533 posts in 1463 days


#10 posted 968 days ago

Mike, Lowes and HD will also carry oak plywood. It isn’t always the best but you can look through for just the right piece and not worry about shipping.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6163 posts in 1427 days


#11 posted 967 days ago

Wow, can’t wait to see it when it’s done. Hope you post it on the project page!

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#12 posted 967 days ago

Another QUESTION:
Can you get 2-sided 1/4in plywood at a reasonable price?

The back panels should not need this nor the flooring of the shelve, BUT the sides of the individual shelving units will have BOTH sides revealed inside and out. As small as each double/pair of side inserts are, would it be better to rip those to size from solid lumber?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14843 posts in 1194 days


#13 posted 967 days ago

Mike, i just bought 2 sided oak 1/4” plywood at home depot for a little less than $26 a sheet. I am using it now.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1678 days


#14 posted 967 days ago

Mike,

Yes, you can. You just have to ne careful sanding the stuff because the top veneer is thinner than a politician’s promise. I personally don’t like plywood, except for speaker cabinets and utility cabinets and prefer hardwood. You’re putting a lot of work into this so you have to be the judge. Consider that ash is a very stable wood, and I have never seen anything relating relative thickness of the material to warp, twist, cup tendancies. Maybe Lowe’s furring stock, but not properly dried, acclimatized hardwood. Epecially a stable wood.

The advantage of plywood would rest in the fact that you can glue it into the dado or groove giving a lot of strength and stabilitty. However, if you are confident in your joinery, that added strength and torsional rigidity is unnecessary in a project like this. If it were something that had to be moved about a lot under a load, ply would be the choice. !/4” is not that thin or weak. Your call. No one will know either way unless you tell them.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6923 posts in 1541 days


#15 posted 967 days ago

Steve SAID Yes, you can. You just have to ne careful sanding the stuff because the top veneer is thinner than a politician’s promise.

Wail Hayeck! In THAT case I could probably get by with 90-grit on my power sander huh… ;-)

But really, my plans call for a single 10 3/4in piece for each side end insert with NO vertical divider. I am wanting to put that additional 2in divider in (just like the image above), so that would mean that I will only need two much narrower pieces about 4 1/2in wide each. That seems easy enough to do for this rookie, PLUS I think that I could actually try to “book-match” these insert pairs on each unit. That would be cool.

Hey Don! I guess I was NOT paying much attention last time I was at HD. I will check that out, especially since they are just 10mi. away. My Hardwood source is 40mi. one-way, or ~$13-$15 in gas/trip. Hate to have to think of such things with that tight of a sphincter but when $$$ are tight… HD to the rescue!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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