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Need help with Stanley Sweetheart 60 1/2 low angle block plane

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Forum topic by jordanusmc posted 945 days ago 2932 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jordanusmc

42 posts in 1016 days


945 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: plane hand tools

I have a couple of questions regarding this plane. I am a very new wood worker and I have a Stanley No. 4 and have sharpened and prepped it for use however my question with the 60 1/2 is:
1) what is really the use for it I bought it at Rockler ( I had gift cards burning a hole in my pocket) and when I asked the workers there the difference between the 60 1/2 and I believe it was a 9 1/2 they really didn’t know besides the angle of the blade. Is there a difference it was my understanding that the low angle block planes were for end grain work is this correct?

2) my other question is with the use of the plane I can not seem to get the blade to protrude pass the “mouth” not nearly as much as my No. 4. Is this normal I tried using it after adjusting the blade a couple of times but I couldn’t quite it it to remove a good amount of wood it seemed to only remove a little bit it was more of a dust then a full shaving. I understand that I don’t want it to gouge bug chunks at once. The more I think about it the fact that it removes it more as a dust may make more sense if it is on end grain in order to prevent tear out.

Thanks in advance for advice. I know that some people get aggravated when people just ask questions, but do not add any help for others or share there projects but due to the fact that I am so new it is hard for me to help anyone. So once again thanks in advance for the help, and hopefully one day I can return the favor.


8 replies so far

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2130 posts in 1712 days


#1 posted 945 days ago

The low angle block plane is more geared for working on end grain while the 9 1/2 works better on edge grain. Lower angles make it easier to push the plane but are more prone to tear out while higher angles work better on figured wood, produce less tear out, but are much more difficult to push. Dust is not ideally what you are shooting for when shaving the end grain. Sometimes I will get a little bit when I first start planing the end but quickly moves to thin shavings. You might want to try honing the blade, that one comes sharp out of the factory but a little honing might be required to be effective. Try extending the blade just a touch more also. I know the knob has a little play and sometimes takes a couple turns in order to extend it out a bit. I think you have it just about borderline. Also, you can get it to go out a little further when you open the mouth of the plane, the lever which opens and closes the mouth should be right on the toe of the plane, under the brass knob.

Hope this helps,

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14659 posts in 1170 days


#2 posted 944 days ago

I have a vintage 60 1/2 Stanley. Its my favorite block plane. A new plane needs to be tuned, from what I understand especially the “new” stanleys. Make sure the sole is reasonably flat, and make sure the blade is sharp. If your getting dust, most likely the blade needs some attention.

You certainly should be able to adjust the blade to go past the mouth. If not, there is something else wrong. You also want to make sure the mouth is adjusted for use. For fine shavings you want just a small opening. Adjust the mouth after you adjust the blade, because lowering the blade will change the mouth opening.

It may help to post some pictures and we may be able to see the problem your having.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View NateX's profile

NateX

88 posts in 1599 days


#3 posted 944 days ago

I had a lot of questions about planes in general and this Lie-Nielsen video really answered a lot of the questions I had. Making sure you take all the back lash out of the adjustment knobs when setting the blade depth was news to me and made a big difference.

Fine Woodworking also put together a pretty good video. Sorting through the you tube videos can be a little tedious and confusing, but there are some good ones.

As to what to do with your plane, Shannon Rogers has a lot of good hand tool videos. This one in particular deals with the block plane.

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jordanusmc

42 posts in 1016 days


#4 posted 943 days ago

Thank you all for the advice and information. I watched the videos also and they helped out a lot also. Now to get the block plane cleaned up and try and makes some good shavings.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1296 days


#5 posted 943 days ago

The older Stanley 60 1/2 is one of my go-to planes. Is it a newer Stanley or an older one. If it’s a newer SW, I returned mine, didn’t like it, so I won’t be much help. Do you understand how the mouth adjustment works? Does it have a stock blade or a replacement? Is the depth adjuster sitting in the iron’s dog hole properly? If you take some pics, we might be better help. Good luck, this is a great plane.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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jordanusmc

42 posts in 1016 days


#6 posted 942 days ago

It is a newer plane. I do understand how the mouth adjustment works, and it also has a stock blade. I am not sure about the depth adjuster. I don’t know what the dog hole is.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1296 days


#7 posted 942 days ago

I probably made up that “dog hole” thing. I’m talking about where the depth adjuster grabs the back of the iron. Of course, the iron needs to be bevel-up, meaning the slots down (If I’m insulting your intelligence, I don’t mean to). See the slots I’m calling dogholes below:

This probably the plane you have, right?

I don’t mean to insult your plane but I hope the Japanning is better than the one in the picture, lol. Again, I sent this plane back (full disclosure).

You’ve got to make sure that the depth adjuster “grabber” fits into the right “doghole” else it can’t protrude the blade properly. On a new iron, I’d expect you to have to draw the depth “grabber” back pretty far. I really need to learn the proper terminology. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14659 posts in 1170 days


#8 posted 942 days ago

Some shots with a #9 1/4 (I don’t have a #9 1/2), some with a #60 1/2.

planing edges (wood here is poplar)

Now end grain shots (red oak)

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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