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Forum topic by WayneC posted 04-20-2007 06:56 AM 6297 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WayneC

12302 posts in 2849 days


04-20-2007 06:56 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tools sharpening jig water stone pinnacle

I thought I would start a forum topic on sharpening. I am currently using water stones to sharpen Plane Irons and Chisels. I have a wolverine jig for sharpening my wood turning tools.

Anyone have recommendations relative to scary sharp. What do you recommend to use for sandpaper? Is there a cheap option? What do you use to mount the paper? What do you mount the paper on?

What about Sharpening Jigs. I use a veritas jig. I know Karson uses the Pinnacle Honing Guide. Any other recommendations.

Any tips or tricks?

Anyone have a Tormack or Jet Sharpener? What is your experience?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov


22 replies so far

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3063 days


#1 posted 04-20-2007 07:48 AM

I’ve found the easiest for me by far is the scary sharp system. This system uses varying grits of sandpaper on a flat surface(can be tile, plexiglass, etc). I use spray adhesive to attach which makes the changeout easy when the sandpaper wears out. I start with 150, 300, 400 and end with 600 grit. Now it is not always necessary to go through all of them everytime. There’s no danger of sparks from a grinder and the learning curve is short. My paper is mounted on a cheeze slicer with the slicer removed. I’ve tried regular, emery and wet/dry sandpaper and find that the regular works best for quick removal of metal and the emery is best to polish up. The wet/dry is o.k. If you have not tried it, do so, you’ll be glad you did. This system made it very easy when flattening the soles of my planes, too.

I was using a grinder and had three different stone grits to sharpen with, but haven’t used them since I tried the scary sharp way.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2832 days


#2 posted 04-20-2007 11:26 AM

Hi Wayne

I have all “army” of water stones from 800 to 8,000 but I don’t use them so much.

As you know, my power is not with words but with pictures so here is my method.

Regards
niki

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View FMOmbr's profile

FMOmbr

47 posts in 2836 days


#3 posted 04-20-2007 11:47 AM

Hi Wayne – I started several years ago using Japanese water stones. I stopped using them partially because of the mess, but mostly because I seemed to spend more time flattening and conditioning them.

I have also used the scary system – in which I mounted various grits of cloth backed paper to a sheet of 1/4” plate glass using a spray adhesive. I abandoned this method for general iron and chisel sharpening. However, I still use it for dressing the soles of my planes.

For the past several years, I have been using the diamond stone sharpening, with a Veritas fixture to hold the irons and chisels. I work through the series of grits for both the primary angle and the secondary bevel (accomodated by the Veritas fixture). Once I have completed the series of grits, I use a modified scary system with 1500 grit wet/dry paper to polish both the front and back of the surface that I’m sharpening. This has worked great for me.

I made several fixtures – one to set the iron into the Veritas fixture (to set the correct angle) and another for holding my mortising chisels (to address the fact that the shafts on these chisels are not flat and don’t hold tight in the Veritas fixture). This assures that I hold the angle through all cuts and that the angle is exactly what I want.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2912 days


#4 posted 04-20-2007 11:47 AM

this is a great forum topic!!!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3051 days


#5 posted 04-20-2007 12:01 PM

You can’t use a guide-holder with my carving gouges because they’re curved. I have a 600 grit diamond hone. Then I apply a very fine silicone carbide powder to my leather strop with vaseline rubbed in. They end up with an ultra shiny, & sharp finish.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1489 posts in 2877 days


#6 posted 04-20-2007 04:04 PM

I was just up in Oregon, where I visited Jerry Work. He happened to be finishing up some writing on the Work Sharp sharpener, and showed it off. Now I want more hand tools so that I can justify one.

The sandpaper is just attached to either spinning glass disks for flat cutters or disks with holes in them for curved cutters. The jig which holds the correct angle is underneath the spinning disk, so that, when you’re sharpeneing curved cutters, you can look down through the disk to see the angle you’re putting on your tool. And while you’d need to buy their consumables for the curved blades (because of the holes), for flat edges you can rub ‘em with whatever materials you’d like, just use a little spray adhesive.

I’ve been a DMT diamond stone fan up ‘til now, but that cool little beastie seemed like the perfect price point (I believe under $200), feature set and size. And it costs a heck of a lot less than a full set of DMT stones.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2849 days


#7 posted 04-21-2007 06:51 AM

Lots of good info. Thanks.

I have a few questions.

Niki, the sander looks like it would work well. How do you flatten and polish the back of the blade?

Dick, do you have to have different profile hones for different profile gouges?

Any recommendations for sources for sandpaper. The big boxes seem to be lacking.

Also, a similar question for Scary Sharp users. How do you flatten and polish the back of the blade?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2849 days


#8 posted 04-21-2007 06:54 AM

I did some looking on the web. Info on the Work Sharp Sharpener can be found at this link. Thanks for pointing this tool out Dan.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Dollarbill's profile

Dollarbill

91 posts in 2890 days


#9 posted 04-21-2007 05:41 PM

Wayne, I have had the Tormex System for about 6 years and I love it. I even use it to make spare change (and friends).

If I had it to do over again, I would look close at the Jet because of the two speed motor.

Bill

-- Make Dust

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2849 days


#10 posted 04-21-2007 09:38 PM

My uncle has the Tormex and loves it as well. I’ll have to check out the Jet. I did not realize it has dual speeds. A machine like this is on my wish list, but down the list a ways.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3971 posts in 2816 days


#11 posted 04-21-2007 11:23 PM

http://www.onlineindustrialsupply.com/wafish.html

Here is a link to Mirka wet/dry sandpaper- they are a Yahoo store. You can pick up a granite tool room slab at Veritas and Grizzly and just use water to mount the paper for scary sharpening. If you have a local automotive finish supply, they usually have great wet-dry paper in grits up to P4000, and Abralon pads, which are the bomb for rubbing out finishes.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2820 days


#12 posted 04-22-2007 02:43 AM

I’ve used oil stones and the scary sharp, never water stones. Now I’m using the DMT diamond stones and I really like those a lot. They seem to work well for me to get my tools sharp and I really like the ease of clean up. Water instead of oil. Rinse the stones when done, pat most of the water off, let them air dry, then put them away.

1 – I seem to be able to get my tools sharp, shave the arm hair and all that
2 – they are easy to store, use, and clean up, no oil or water baths

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 2828 days


#13 posted 04-22-2007 07:33 AM

Thanks for starting the forum! I like my diamond stones and jig for sharpening my chisels and plane irons. But what is the best way to sharpen jointer blades? They are too wide to fit into the jig I use for my chisels.
Thanks.
God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

View photonic's profile

photonic

17 posts in 2818 days


#14 posted 04-23-2007 07:37 PM

I used to use stones but then I switched to the scary sharp system. I use regular sandpaper with grits up to 2000 on a slab of granite. If you ask around at shops that do stone work you can get cut offs for free!

-- Geoff Webb, Spokane WA

View Wooder's profile

Wooder

163 posts in 2938 days


#15 posted 04-23-2007 07:57 PM

SS and a peice of laminate covered MDF. Has worked just fine and cheap too! Get my sandpaper from a auto parts store to 2000 grit. A few strokes on the 2000 to finish is all that’s needed.

-- Jimmy

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