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Forum topic by pierce85 posted 12-26-2011 07:32 PM 1408 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


12-26-2011 07:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joining

My bench top will be laminated with a 5/4 Maple surface on top of three layers of Poplar. My concern is with securing the breadboard ends to the Poplar. The ends are Maple, approximately 3 inches wide and 4 inches thick. I plan to mortise and tenon the ends, glue the centers and secure them with Spax screws.

Will the Poplar be too soft to secure these beefy breadboard ends?


16 replies so far

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#1 posted 12-28-2011 04:41 AM

I realize this isn’t as relevant or exciting as the non-shop talk forum stuff, but I was hoping to get some words of wisdom. Am I safe using Poplar to attach my breadboards? Thanks for the help!

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Mark Shymanski

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#2 posted 12-29-2011 06:37 AM

Four layers for the top…different woods…I,’D be concerned about differential movement especially with respect to popular/maple.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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fussy

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#3 posted 12-29-2011 09:13 AM

Pierce, could you put up a drawing or something. I’m having trouble visualizing this.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#4 posted 12-29-2011 02:47 PM

I’m basically following Garrett Hack’s design for the top. He used different secondary woods under the Maple top – it wasn’t Maple all the way through, just the top layer. Here’s a link to the video:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/PlansAndProjects/PlansAndProjectsarticle.aspx?id=33097

Thanks, guys!

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fussy

980 posts in 2510 days


#5 posted 12-29-2011 05:17 PM

Pierce,

I wouldn’t have thought of that, but then I’m not Garrett Hack ( I do have more hair). If he says it will work, it will work. Poplar is a very strong wood, just not hard or heavy. I suspect, without taking time to read the whole article-later, he’s doing it this way to get some shock-absorption from the poplar. Solid maple benches can be kinda ‘bouncy’ which can affect accuracy.

It looks as if you are good to go. Just use sound woodworking technique, take your time, take pictures, and enjoy. I don’t think you could tear that thing up with a wrecking ball and 2 sticks of dynamite. I might use that design myself. 35” makes sense to me; I’m 5’9’’, but have a bad back. I like it.

Be safe and happy New Year.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#6 posted 12-29-2011 06:16 PM

Thank you, Steve. I should have mentioned that Hack was using Yellow Birch and Beech underneath his top layer of Maple, not Poplar. Anyway, I’ll be using the middle two layers of Poplar for my tenons. Here’s what the top will look like:

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fussy

980 posts in 2510 days


#7 posted 12-29-2011 06:25 PM

Pierce,

That will work well. It will be heavy enough with poplar, and as I said will be a little less bouncy. I like it. Too many go over board with huge monster benches that are a nightmare to finance, boild, or move. Yhis will hold up and be as useful as any other. Good, design, good use of material. Poplar os stable too.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#8 posted 12-29-2011 06:31 PM

The “shock-absorption from the poplar” is something I hadn’t considered – very cool and a great observation!

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#9 posted 12-29-2011 06:35 PM

that is an interesting concept – I’d also be concerned about different layers moving around differently over time. no bench will ever stay perfect, but I’d rather build it to minimize the movements and imperfections. If I was to do this sort of build I’d probably use plywood as the sub layers and build it much like hardwood floors are put together. maybe 2-3 layers of 3/4 plywood and maple “flooring” arrangement on top (although you also could just top it with a nice layer of birch or maple 3/4 plywood as well and forgo the entire ‘top movement’ altogether.

not trying to discourage you, just putting out my thoughts out there.

As for bouncy hadrwood workbenches – I’m not sure what it means. if you overbuild your bench and it is heavy and stout it will not bounce, nor will it move anywhere during work- and I’ve tried.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13712 posts in 2078 days


#10 posted 12-29-2011 06:39 PM

Three layers of 3/4” plywood would make it very heavy, and breadboarding concerns would be addressed too. Not a bad idea to think about…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#11 posted 12-29-2011 08:20 PM

PurpLev and Smitty, how would you attached the three sheets of plywood to the Maple top? I want to keep the top a solid wood. Also, would the ply have any affect on keeping holdfasts secure?

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#12 posted 12-29-2011 09:51 PM

I would probably screw it from the below so that the top is clear to the view. the screws should pull all the layers tight together, and if you don’t glue it it will also allow for the top to move as it wants to.

OR

you could really do it hardwood floor style and rabbet the hardwood top with tongue and groove and nail the boards to the ply base in the tongues then put the next board to cover it with the groove… rinse and repeat

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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pierce85

508 posts in 2022 days


#13 posted 12-30-2011 02:25 AM

Thanks, PurpLev. This gives me another option to consider. I just need to build the damn thing…

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404 - Not Found

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#14 posted 12-30-2011 03:39 AM

I wouldn’t worry about the poplar lamination, one of it’s properties is it’s very stable once dry. How much force are you going to apply to the ends? Someone, somewhere, has probably made one of these with just a domino jointer and I’ll bet it hasn’t moved.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13712 posts in 2078 days


#15 posted 12-30-2011 03:47 AM

I don’t believe the plywood would react badly to holdfasts. And ditto what purplev says re: attaching everything. Bread oard ends will pull it all together too.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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