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45 degrees of pain

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Forum topic by zindel posted 12-23-2011 11:31 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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zindel

257 posts in 2110 days


12-23-2011 11:31 PM

So the other day i was watching a few videos on FWW and this guy was talking about how he uses a chamfer bit to make a perfect 45 degree cut for his boxes. So i thought to myself and that seems like it would make 45 degree cuts much easier especially if you had a router table with it setup this way at all times…if you wanted to anyways. So i thought i would share and ask if anyone else has done this?

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, You've got an electrical problem.


5 replies so far

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#1 posted 12-24-2011 12:15 AM

I can see where a 45 degree chamfer bit would make perfect corners, but I also see one problem….

There are two things needed for a perfect mitered-corner rectangular box. One is that the the cuts are exactly 45 degrees, and the other is that the opposing sides are exactly the same length. No matter how perfect your miter cuts are, if one side is 1/8” longer than the other side, the corners will not go together properly.

I’m sure there are some ways to attack this problem. One that comes to mind is to chamfer the ends of one wide piece of stock, and then rip it into two box sides. I’m just saying…. perfect 45’s aren’t the whole story.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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zindel

257 posts in 2110 days


#2 posted 12-24-2011 12:20 AM

Charlie i agree with you, but i would think if you mill the wood properly everything SHOULD be square. anyways it was just interesting because the guy said he never has a bad fit when he uses a chamfer bit. but you make a great point!

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, You've got an electrical problem.

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#3 posted 12-24-2011 12:38 AM

Actually, you bring up another point. One would have to be very careful (using a miter gauge or some type of jig) to make sure the stock was kept square when making the chamfer cuts.

I was actually talking about the difficulty of keeping both sides of the box (left/right or front/back) the same length. It would be real easy when using the chamfer bit to accidentally take off a bit of length from your work piece. The proper setting of the fence would be critical.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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zindel

257 posts in 2110 days


#4 posted 12-24-2011 12:56 AM

oh for sure! the guy in the video said he has a table that is setup just for 45 degree cuts and never touches it because he has it just how he needs it. but yes the stock would have to be a good 90 to the fence. good point…but i can see the appeal i would say its easier to get a fence correct once and leave it and always be able to cut 45s quickly and easy.

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, You've got an electrical problem.

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 3204 days


#5 posted 12-24-2011 03:44 AM

I’ve used 45 degree router bits to make the sides for quadrilinear leg construction and the angles have come out good. I use a bearing guided bit, which will not take the angel all the way to the edge. I milled the leg pieces thicker than I needed, cut the angle with the bit, leaving a little for the bearing to ride on, then ran the wide side through the planer to get the angle to the edge.

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