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Plain trunk storage chest/trunk

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Forum topic by DonB posted 12-23-2011 06:53 PM 1629 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DonB

489 posts in 2158 days


12-23-2011 06:53 PM

I want to store standard 5 gal gasoline containers in a trunk – outside away from the house. Does anyone have plans that are simple, that I could modify to accept inside measurements of 44” long, 23” tall by 20” deep. This is not a piece of furniture. I need to store 5, 5 gal standard plastic gas containers for my 5500W generator that I use during/after hurricanes. For obvious reasons, I do not want that much gas in the garage.

-- DonB


13 replies so far

View casual1carpenter's profile

casual1carpenter

354 posts in 1941 days


#1 posted 12-23-2011 07:12 PM

Don, just my two cent’s but:

What tools do you have available to use?

Do you have a look or style in mind?

What are material preferences?

Is security a concern? 25 gal amounts to a few bucks and hours of free joy riding.

What are your skill and ability levels?

You might get people interested in helping you out with sketch, design or rough plan if they had a bit more to go on. People here are friendly and supportive, but a bit more info is necessary.

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DonB

489 posts in 2158 days


#2 posted 12-23-2011 07:31 PM

Tools: hand saw, circular saw, drill, drill press, sander, assorted screw drivers and wrenches. Style: I guess a steamer trunk or basic chest. Material: treated 2×4 and tung/grove or plywood. Security is not a problem, it cannot be seen from the street and is essentially in the middle of a garden with azalea bushes blocking the view. Skill/ability: Just finished a shed that was 6’Tx24D”x36”W. Which is why I need this chest/trunk. The gas was stored in the 15 y/o shed which finally died due to our warm/wet weather and I had to move the location of the smaller new shed next to the house. Also just finished stackable sawhorses made of 2/4s.

-- DonB

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#3 posted 12-23-2011 07:33 PM

DonB – how about a modified version of a six board chest? Pressure treated lumber, dimension lumber on inside corners (2×2 or 2×4, your call), vented accordingly with simple hinged lid?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1821 days


#4 posted 12-23-2011 07:46 PM

Being that it’s for hurricane use, you’re really looking for somethign a bit more beefed up than just a chest that can get blown around.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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DonB

489 posts in 2158 days


#5 posted 12-23-2011 07:57 PM

Smitty_Cabinetshop: The 6 Board looks as if it could be modified OK, if I can find inexpensive wood. I dont want this to be overly costly.
TCCcabinetmaker: Your right on being beefed up. But this will be in the back corner of the yard with wood privacy fences on the south and east sides (the hurricane’s strongest sides) and hidden amongst the bigger azaleas. 2X4s may be larger than I need, but might provide the strength to ‘weather’ the storm.
I may use a treated 2X4 base with sides like a 6 board chest and use lapped cement board front/back since the board will not rot. I’ll have to think about the top. (Needs to be a chest like top that overlaps the chest to keep water out and its easier to secure). My 50 year bride surprised me with a $200 Lowe’s gift card today. So once I can plan this out…....

-- DonB

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#6 posted 12-23-2011 08:00 PM

Understood. Look for pressure treated plywood and 2x material, anchor it via the method of your choice, and you should be in business. It’d be a pretty straightforward build, I think.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#7 posted 12-23-2011 08:09 PM

I understand you not wanting that much gas in the garage, but how about you got 5 industrial combustion proof gas cans. You could safely store it in the garage and cost would probably be about the same. Just an additional thought.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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DonB

489 posts in 2158 days


#8 posted 12-23-2011 09:03 PM

Thanks for the input guys, even the industrial combustion proof gas cans have merit. Nice bike DonW.

-- DonB

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

273 posts in 2036 days


#9 posted 12-23-2011 09:51 PM

if you these cans full at all times, in case of a hurricane, I assume that you need to use that gas & re-fill the cans at some point to keep it fresh? What about something portable, that could be rolled onto a trailer for refilling or something?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#10 posted 12-24-2011 05:56 AM

Rubbermaid makes a big black jobsite box that is watertight and might work well for you. If you didn’t like the looks of it you could easily screen it with fencing, etc.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1821 days


#11 posted 12-24-2011 07:29 AM

It will need to breath though, otherwise the vapors can build up, and a privacy fence won’t really stop 140mph winds. Like I said, it needs to be beefed up, like into the ground beefed up.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View casual1carpenter's profile

casual1carpenter

354 posts in 1941 days


#12 posted 12-24-2011 07:02 PM

DonB Don’t know if you still plan to build the Plain trunk storage chest/trunk or not. The 5 industrial combustion proof gas cans was a very good idea if you have the garage space you want to loose. I see on your profile you are a 31 year navy vet, so I’m pretty sure you experienced the various strengths of Mother Nature. Except for the submarine service time.

I did a quick thing trying to account for your available tooling. Ohh, there is no lid, kind of stuck there as I hate exposed and unfinished plywood edges and I would have preferred a slope on top to shed the rain.

Would use (6) 2”x4” x8’ PT

(2) 2”x6” x8’ PT

(1) 3/4” 4’ x 8’ plywood PT

I did not do weight calculation estimate but this thing would be a bit heavy even empty.

Good luck with whatever you decide, I’ve done the flood thing but never the hurricane thing.

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DonB

489 posts in 2158 days


#13 posted 02-10-2012 04:13 PM

To the casual1carpenter, My product looks very much like yours. I used treated 2×4s for a box bottom with the tall side up and notched a 2×4 flat side up into the ends for the containers to rest on. Otherwise the bottom is open for lots-a-venting. The top is three boards glued with biskets side and top. Everything is treated except the top, which has 4 coats of solid stain. It weighs a ton. I neglected to account for the nozzel/neck height and had difficulty with fitting them in and shutting the top. Its tight, but works. What I need are caps without the nozzel for the top of the cans. The old system could turn the nozzel back inside the cap, but the newer ones dont allow that. Progress is not always our most important product. Thanks for the comments, they were all helpful. I also put feet on the corners to elevate the box and keep it off the wet ground and aid in venting.

-- DonB

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