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How do you lube the ways on your horizontal moriser?

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 12-23-2011 05:27 PM 1202 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


12-23-2011 05:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mortiser

Mine is a Laguna, and not being familiar with others, I don’t know if they share the same challenge. The ways are machined steel rod. The table is line bored in two planes to accommodate the rods. If those surfaces don’t stay slickery, the table moves jerkily and the results aren’t optimal.

Looking forward to your input.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


19 replies so far

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#1 posted 12-23-2011 05:41 PM

Lee:

Do you think there would be much difference between lubrication strategies for your mortiser, and for your “standard” benchtop mortiser ?

On my benchtop, I use a very light coating of grease. Doesn’t seem to collect much dust and dirt, and … does a good job of reducing friction.

-- -- Neil

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#2 posted 12-23-2011 05:50 PM

Horizontal morisers require special horizontal grease. It comes in a six inch wide, one inch tall tube and has to be applied while laying down…

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#3 posted 12-23-2011 05:54 PM

Stump: can I assume that the converse is true ?

Should I be buying a 1” wide, 6” tall tube of grease, and apply it, only when standing ?

That WOULD explain a great deal…. ;-)

-- -- Neil

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#4 posted 12-23-2011 05:57 PM

Of course not, Neil. That wouldn’t make sense at all…

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#5 posted 12-23-2011 05:57 PM

Yes, there is a significant difference between the two.

On a benchtop, the wood is static and the motor/bit moves up and down. No big deal.

When you put a piece of 6/4×6 3/4×60 inch cherry on a horizontal mortiser, you are moving the work into the cutter. When you are mortising for the last stave, the whole rest of the board is hanging off one side of the table. That’s a big lever arm affecting the friction between the table and the ways.

Hence the question.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#6 posted 12-23-2011 05:57 PM

Okay. THAT clears everything up, Stump.

I must buy a 3” x 3” tube, and apply it ONLY when standing at a 45 degree angle.

This is going to be tough, but … I AM motivated.

-- -- Neil

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#7 posted 12-23-2011 06:00 PM

My sister always stands at a 45 degree angle but it’s because one leg is shorter than the other.

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#8 posted 12-23-2011 06:01 PM

Sorry, Lee. Back to you.

Stump: give my best, and my Holiday Wishes, to Eileen.

-- -- Neil

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#9 posted 12-23-2011 06:06 PM

No problem, Neil. There’s always room for Silly.

Kindly,

Lee
And if you guys are going to talk about degrees this and degrees that, it would be helpful if you’d convert that to parts-of-bubble-out-of-plumb for those of us who aren’t as eddicated.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#10 posted 12-23-2011 06:10 PM

And before we get off irrelevance, I hope you’ll go visit my ebay auction for a really impressive chisel set. I’ve got only 200 views and I’d like to see that doubled and more and the sands are falling in the ol’ hourglass.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#11 posted 12-23-2011 06:17 PM

FWIW … I got curious. The manual link, at Laguna, seems dead. You probably knew that.

How like yours is the Felder Hammer ??

According to its manual .... they should be cleaned, but NOT oiled or greased.

Have you reached out to Laguna, to take advantage of their famously helpful customer service ? ;-)

-- -- Neil

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#12 posted 12-23-2011 06:44 PM

I am not familiar with this Felder machine. Same concept, but it has one handle and mine has two, one for each axis.

The Felder is a more elegant and finished machine than mine. (I’ll post a pic shortly.)

I would guess the manual instructions indicate that the bearings are oil impregnated bronze. Mine clearly aren’t.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#13 posted 12-23-2011 06:49 PM

Shopbuilt base, 1 hp motor, custom made arbor. A friend did this, then retired; I was at the right place at the right time.

He preferred to use milling bits, which I continue to do.

You can see the ways parallel with the bit in the bottom image. On the far one there’s a ring with a set screw; that is the depth stop. It picks up some crud over time; I think a simple shield over it will fix that little annoyance.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#14 posted 12-23-2011 08:05 PM

I had a Robland XSD with a mortiser for awhile. I use to hit the ways with
a brass wire brush periodically. I probably waxed them once or twice,
but I think I used spray graphite whenever it would act up and the
graphite helped a lot.

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#15 posted 12-23-2011 08:06 PM

Rick—your post underscores your signature line—thank you very much for your insights.

My friend would only have done this the right way, and I assumed the motor/mandrel was superior to a router, but I am curious why.

Looks like 3” pulley on the 3450 motor, 2” on the mandrel.

I have a Shopsmith 10ER that gets the call for horizontal drilling, so the Robland is a one trick pony (which is fine so long as the trick is good!). I am currently using a four-flute mill which is fine in hardwood. Soft wood chips would have a hard time getting out of the way promptly. That’s when the 2-flute would be the Good Thing, I would think.

I’ll try paste wax.

And thanks Loren—I’ll try the graphite, which I have on the “other” shelf.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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