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Forum topic by dieselman posted 05-08-2008 12:08 AM 8182 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dieselman

5 posts in 3820 days


05-08-2008 12:08 AM

I have a chance to buy a Craftsman model # 315.228490 in excellant condition.It was bought new
in 02,can anybody tell me what series this saw is ? contractor, pro model. Saw has cast iron and is
heavy,also has 10” blade, also if any body knows of a book I can buy that could tell me what each
saw is,
And while i,m at it,last night I was on Google looking for Craftsman saws and what should appear but
my first post on this site,like Tony says, what the hell. talk to me webb master
Dieselhammer

-- DIESELHAMMER


10 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 3964 days


#1 posted 05-08-2008 02:14 AM

I have a Craftsman saw 315.228310 that I bought in 1998. So this should be the same series but just a later model. It looks identical to my saw which is a contractor’s model. I have used mine for 10 years and it works ok. The miter gauge is adequate but the fence is poor. I replaced the miter gauge with an Incra 1000SE this year and that problem was resolved. But the fence is another issue. Other LJs have replaced their stock fences with the Delta T2 fence but I haven’t been able to do this on mine. The issue with the fence is simply that it is not very reliable. It relies on tension to keep the front and rear aligned and this doesn’t work very well. To make an accurate cut with it you have to set the blade and fence distance. Then measure the distance from a miter gauge slot to the front and rear faces of the fence and make sure that these distances are equal. Then you have to check and usually reset the blade to fence distance and repeat the front and rear fences measurements again. With reiterations of this eventually the fence is aligned and the blade distance gets set. But it is a challenge if you need to make different cuts.

Hope this helps.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View MLK's profile

MLK

82 posts in 3953 days


#2 posted 05-11-2008 07:06 AM

I have the same saw I bought it new in 1999 and Scott is right about the fence, it’s really bad. I replaced mine with the Delta T2 and it made all the difference in the world.

View runngt's profile

runngt

120 posts in 3882 days


#3 posted 05-13-2008 11:04 PM

I think I have the same saw, if not it’s a craftsman and a great saw except for the fence. Like Scott said the fences are pretty much junk. As it stands right now a new better fence is not in the budget, but I do have a widget that could make yours and Scott’s life easier to avoid a lot a measuring front to back over and over again. A friend of mine made it and it works dang good. I will take a pic of it and post on a new thread as not to hijack yours.

-- It seem's I just make scrap wood and saw dust most of the time !

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

157 posts in 223 days


#4 posted 07-25-2018 10:43 PM

This is a 10-year-old thread, but I have a 315.228310 and don’t understand what the problem with the fence is.

I aligned the scale, and it’s nuts-on every time.

Can someone explain why I’m unhappy even though I don’t know it?

View toolie's profile

toolie

2144 posts in 2771 days


#5 posted 07-27-2018 12:53 PM

My suspicion is that most people think they can use these types of fences, which grab both front and back, like a T-square fence (which attaches to the front fence rail only). As they try to slide the fence using the head only, the fence winds up getting cocked, and an inattentive operator doesn’t notice this, proceeds to lock the fence in place (which is misaligned) and figures the fence is defective. Registering the head of the fence to the front fence rail first, before locking, will eliminate that problem. I have both a T2 fence and a stock Ridgid fence on similar Emerson built tablesaws and both are flawlessly accurate and consistent.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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nickbatz

157 posts in 223 days


#6 posted 07-27-2018 06:55 PM

Yeah, you have to push it forward before locking the fence.

But really, that’s all it takes to call a product junk?! To me this saw is fabulous.

View uptoolateman's profile

uptoolateman

42 posts in 213 days


#7 posted 07-28-2018 12:53 AM

I finally installed a vsc fence and heavy duty guide tube on my 315 saw this year, much improvement over the original. I used it for 12 plus years though and it did the job

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nickbatz

157 posts in 223 days


#8 posted 07-28-2018 01:03 AM

So far I haven’t run into the limitations of the stock one.

And 12 years is fine with me. :) I did run into the limitations of my first table saw, a $50 Craigslist Craftsman that I bought in February and replaced after three months.

But I’m very happy with the 315. If I need to rip something more than 2’ from the blade, that’s why God created circular saws and Izzy Swan straight-edge guides.

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toolie

2144 posts in 2771 days


#9 posted 07-28-2018 01:58 PM



Yeah, you have to push it forward before locking the fence.

But really, that s all it takes to call a product junk?! To me this saw is fabulous.

- nickbatz

They are quite good saws and are clones of the Emerson Electric built ridgid 2412, 2424 and 3612. That fence is almost identical to the fence on my souped up Ridgid 2412 and its every bit as reliable as the T2 on my Cman 113 saw.

The Cman315s differ from the Ridgid’s in that the 315s have a 2 piece front rail, which can lead to fence alignment issues at wider rips if the bracing rod between the front and rear rails is not positioned to keep the distance between the rails consistent with what it is at the table saw’s table. Also, the Ridgid’s had a better system for mounting the splitter than the 315s do. The Ridgid system allowed for the removal and replacement of the splitter without the need to realign the splitter.

BTW, assuming the rails are mounted to the table the same way as the Ridgid’s are, they can be slid to the right for added rip capacity if you don’t mind giving up the use of the tape on the front rail.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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nickbatz

157 posts in 223 days


#10 posted 07-28-2018 08:05 PM

The front and rear rails are 1-piece on mine, toolie, and I believe the rear rail won’t move very far past the point where the front rail’s ruler is aligned. I could be wrong – I only looked at it once, and it’s possible that I could just remove the end cap or something…

...but there’s an overriding factor: I’m way too lazy for that. :)

The saw’s aligned perfectly to the ruler, and I’m happy either using my circular saw (which isn’t a crime!) or just having the lumber yard cut sheets down to a size I can deal with.

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