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Botched my lamination. Tightbond III in the planer?

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Forum topic by Michael Wilson posted 12-17-2011 08:04 PM 818 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1146 days


12-17-2011 08:04 PM

So I screwed up in my haste. Unfortunately my first maple cutting board went off without a hitch, so I’m not sure how to contend with this pair of issues.

In trying to get everything clamped before the glue set (and before dinner time) I made two mistakes:

1) I didn’t wipe off the excess glue that squnched out the bottom of the laminations.
2) I clamped them down with something that wasn’t true. (I’m convinced I

So I’ve got a stave or two that’s out of alignment in the important dimension (i.e. if you laid the lamination flat, one board would be raised.)

How can I salvage what I’ve done? Is it safe to put something like that through a planer or is the dried glue going to make short work of it?

A little more information: I’m taking maple boards 1×2x20”, laying them out flat and gluing the 1” sides together to form the initial lamination for an edge-grain board. (well, boards.)

Help me obi-wan, you’re my only hope.


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7560 posts in 2303 days


#1 posted 12-17-2011 08:10 PM

Scrape off the glue on the joints with a paint scraper or
card scraper. Then you can run it through the planer.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1146 days


#2 posted 12-17-2011 08:12 PM

Hmm. Didn’t occur to me a paint scraper would hold up to that glue. Thanks o/

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

573 posts in 1721 days


#3 posted 12-17-2011 08:12 PM

Scrape off as much of the glue as possible, and go ahead and run it through the planer. Put your flattest slide down. If it rocks on both sides take a belt sander or a hand plane and knock down the high points so that you will have a side that is flat enough so that it won’t rock, and place that side down on the planer bed.

If you have a piece that is so far out of alignment that it will cause the board to be too thin if you plane it flat, then you can simply cut out that board and glue in a new one. Be careful when you do this so that you remove the glue from the joint so that you are not putting glue on glue, which would form a weak joint.

I have made a lot of corrections like this on cutting boards, and never had to scrap one entirely.

Good luck!

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1010 days


#4 posted 12-17-2011 08:19 PM

Ok, here’s how I approach this situation, wiping off the glue is a good thing to do, but the planer will honestly take out glue drips without a problem. Just start a hair wider than your original thickness (this accomadates for high points on the ridges) and flip over at the finished thickness of the stock before you glued up. you may still have a little glue, but if you’re planning to take off an 1/8 or so you probably will come out fine. But scrape it iffen it makes ya feel better.

I keep a 5 gallon bucket partially filled with water near my workbench, in that water is a thick sponge like the type you find in the tile section of the box stores. Being so close at hand it takes seconds to wipe down glue runs. Only glue up 1 piece at a time, that way you know you have the time to get the clamps set. And with tightbond you’ve got a little working time.

P.S The key is to never panic, mistakes can be fixed one way or another ;)

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Dallas's profile (online now)

Dallas

2906 posts in 1142 days


#5 posted 12-17-2011 08:32 PM

Umm, Wellllll.. At least you didn’t accidentally set the glued up wood on a piece of Luaun.

It wasn’t me, HONEST! It was my helper in the shop that did it, yeah, that’s the story I’m goin’ with!

My helper:

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3455 posts in 2616 days


#6 posted 12-17-2011 09:48 PM

ENTIRELY TOO LAZY HELPER.
I’ll bet the cat wants to eat all the time as well. Just like all “hired” help.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1146 days


#7 posted 12-17-2011 09:49 PM

Ok, my concern with the planer was mistreating the blades with the glue. I wasn’t sure if they’d be up to it or if it would gum them up somehow. I can live with a thinner bunch of cross-cuts, it’ll be..hmm… a FEATURE! That’s it! It’s a design feature!

(Suddenly I understand where a lot of strange aesthetics in cutting boards come from.)

Thanks very much everyone. You’ve saved Christmas.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1010 days


#8 posted 12-18-2011 05:36 AM

If the glue is not wet still, then it won’t be a problem. What I have a problem with atm on the shop planer is heart pine sap, and nails I didn’t catch in time… Yeesh

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1010 days


#9 posted 12-18-2011 05:37 AM

Oh and yes cr1, I have, it’s loud, often smells funny, and um well it’s not the smoothest finish on the other side, shows how uneven the plys can be though.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View jeth's profile

jeth

210 posts in 1493 days


#10 posted 12-18-2011 07:39 AM

I have a cheap No.4 handplane that I use to take off dry glue squeeze out. Take a fairly light cut as too deep and the blade just catches on the globules of glue and either sticks, or chips. In a minute or two I can have all the glue lines o na panel clean and levelled to boot :)

I have recently found the best option for wet clean up during glue up to be one of the little sponge/fibre pads they sell for washing dishes, with green scourer one side and sponge backing. The scourer really picks up the glue and then the sponge, just sliightly dampened, wipes clean any residue.

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1578 days


#11 posted 12-18-2011 01:48 PM

Dallas, is your helper on the clock?

-- Life is good.

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