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filling voids - sequence?

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Forum topic by leeko posted 12-16-2011 11:55 PM 1254 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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leeko

15 posts in 2092 days


12-16-2011 11:55 PM

Hi all,

I’m making a chess board using maple and walnut, and am about to start finishing. I have a few voids in the walnut, and was initially going to leave them as is, for a more rustic finish. But, I decided I’d like to create a more glassy, polished look to the finish, so I’m planning to fill the voids with either CA glue or lacquer, and finish with lacquer. Pictures are below.

My question is: what would be the optimal sequence? Ideally, I’d like to just use the lacquer to fill the gaps (which look kind of like a brown peapod cut along its length. But, to get the really smooth finish I’m looking for, I’m planning to use a grain filler such as jasco. I’m guessing that the grain filler would get in the holes, and make a big mess?

In that case, should I try to fill them with CA glue BEFORE using the grain filler? I’m a little concerned about the CA glue staining the walnut.

Pic1
Pic2
Pic3

p.s. anyone know what these voids are called, or what causes them?

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Regards,

Lee


8 replies so far

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2412 posts in 2386 days


#1 posted 12-17-2011 03:18 AM

Have you considered an epoxy to fill them with? I use a product called “Z-Poxy” to fill voids.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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leeko

15 posts in 2092 days


#2 posted 12-17-2011 03:35 AM

I hadn’t thought about that -is there an advantage over CA glue?

View camps764's profile

camps764

867 posts in 1824 days


#3 posted 12-17-2011 02:55 PM

I’ve read a lot of folks using various epoxy’s to do the job. From what I understand doesn’t matter what kind of epoxy you use as long as it dries clear. I am using some reclaimed lumber in a project and plan to fill a lot of nail holes and voids with epoxy as well.

-- Steve

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Jim Finn

2412 posts in 2386 days


#4 posted 12-17-2011 02:58 PM

What I like about Z-Poxy is that is actually an epoxy finishing resin and is thinner than other epoxy. Easier to work out any bubbles, in my experience.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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leeko

15 posts in 2092 days


#5 posted 12-24-2011 06:49 PM

Thanks for all the advice,

I’ll pick up some epoxy and get filling :)

Lee

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leeko

15 posts in 2092 days


#6 posted 12-31-2011 09:31 PM

Thanks everyone for the replies. I went ahead and filled with epoxy. It dried clear with only a few bubbles. I then used a card scraper to get it back level, but after scraping the epoxy is a dull gray colour – not clear anymore. It seems to clear up when wetted e.g. with naphtha, so I’m hoping when the finish is applied it’ll have the same effect!

Thanks,

Lee

View Al Killian's profile

Al Killian

85 posts in 2090 days


#7 posted 01-01-2012 02:53 AM

Them voids are from either insect damage or injury to the tree. For a filler I would go with walnut sawdust mixed with some blonde shellac. Once it dries it will be very close to the same color. From there use a coat of lacquer sealer followed by several coats of high gloss lacquer.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

View Daver725's profile

Daver725

13 posts in 1800 days


#8 posted 01-03-2012 04:03 AM

I would agree with Al’s post if you want the imperfections less knowticable. If you want them to still be seen I would use the epoxy. I’ve had good luck using the sawdust method myself. Especially on oil finishes, using grain sealer and wet sanding it in.

Dave

-- Insanity, doing the same same thing over and expecting different results.

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