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Delta Unisaw 34-802 Type 1 vs Type 2

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Forum topic by TheBirdMan posted 12-16-2011 09:55 PM 7807 views 3 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1157 days


12-16-2011 09:55 PM

Not to long ago I bought an older Delta Unisaw Model# 34-802. As with many older saws there was no manual, the motor cover was missing, the front door cover was missing, and it was time to find some replacement parts.

Turns out there are two types of Unisaws with the model# of 34-802, Type 1 and Type 2. After many hours of searching for parts I finally ran across a picture of the Type 1 and Type 2 at ereplacementparts.com. I now know that I have a Model# 34-802 “Type 1” Unisaw. Below is a drawing of each model.

Type 1 (notice the openings in the base):

Type 2 (notice how different the openings are & no door in the front):

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com


12 replies so far

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chrisstef

11479 posts in 1759 days


#1 posted 04-30-2012 11:02 PM

Birdman, how do you like the saw? Ive got my eye on one at the current moment. I was wondering the difference between the 2 types so thanks for the leg work on that.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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Scot

344 posts in 2149 days


#2 posted 04-30-2012 11:10 PM

The type 2 was brought about because of dust collection and it was less expensive to manufacture without the door on the front and the cast iron base. if my memory is correct, there was little or no change to the trunnions, however the miter slots were now t-slot type.

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

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TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1157 days


#3 posted 05-01-2012 12:54 AM

Chris, the saw is very powerful and will rip through everything you throw at it. Dust collection is always the problem with these saws, but with a little thought and work I was able to come up with a decent way to collect dust from the base and from around the blade.

I also found an Outfeed Roller Table on craigslist that makes my life a lot easier. This Outfeed Table also swings down when not in use. One of the great things about these heavy cabinet saws is that you can attach anything to them without them tipping over.

I also purchased a roller base for the cabinet and an extension roller base from Grizzly for the extension table so I can move the whole unit around. This works great!

Bottom line is if you do, or plan to, a lot of cutting you will love these cabinet saws.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com

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b2rtch

4351 posts in 1801 days


#4 posted 05-10-2012 12:00 PM

Hey , Birdman:
the saw is very powerful and will rip through everything you throw at it. Dust collection is always the problem with these saws, but with a little thought and work I was able to come up with a decent way to collect dust from the base and from around the blade.”

How did you do that?
Any pictures ?
Thanks

-- Bert

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ScottKaye

312 posts in 706 days


#5 posted 02-08-2013 11:08 PM

I have a type 1 as I have the door in the front and the plate that covers the dust collection area in the back. BUT I have T-Style miter slots in mine so maybe both the type one and the type two come with t-style. by the way.. anyone have any luck finding a manual for the type 1?

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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Grandpa

3211 posts in 1428 days


#6 posted 02-08-2013 11:40 PM

http://servicenet.deltamachinery.com/Products/Detail?isId=true&productNumber=36-L552&selectedType=24815

I think you can download one here. I found one on line so they are available at not cost.

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TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1157 days


#7 posted 02-09-2013 12:03 AM

Grandpa, this link you post is for model 36-L552. For those looking for the manual for a model 34-802 you can use the link Grandpa posts and in the search box type in 34-802. It will ask you which saw you have Type 1 or Type 2.

No matter which type you choose the same users manual is listed, part number 422-04-651-0039. Most likely they sent the same manual with both type saws. This manual has worked fine for my type 1 saw even though the picture on the manual looks to be a type 2.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com

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ScottKaye

312 posts in 706 days


#8 posted 02-09-2013 01:46 AM

Thanks for the info guys. And birdman, do you have any photos of how you solved your dust collecting situation with this saw?

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1157 days


#9 posted 02-09-2013 03:15 PM

Scott, I have solved the bottom dust collection, but for the blade this has been a challange and probably the #1 reason people have moved away from this saw. I have yet to figure out a great way to collect the particles coming off the blade that fly right into you while moving wood through this saw. I have tried about a dozen different designs I have come up with and none of them are very effective.

You can get both front and motor covers from http://www.bell-plastic.com/milling-saw-supplies/table-saw-parts/saw-door-panel-motor-cover-combo.html. I have pretty much solved the bottom cabinet dust collection.

For the inside bottom of the cabinet I made a two piece plywood floor and used silicone to hold it in. On my cabinet there were a few additional holes on the motor side of the cabinet for some unknown reason and I used blocks of wood and glued them over the holes from the inside of the cabinet. I cut a 6” hole on the bottom of the left side of the cabinet for connecting my dust collector. I installed a 6” collar, purchased from www.spiralmfg.com, and connected to a piece of plywood with a 6” hole cut in it (just large enough for the collar) and bolted it together. I then added a piece of 1/2” weather stripping around the collar and installed it from the inside of the cabinet.

If you plan to add a roller table like I did, http://www.grizzly.com/products/37-Outfeed-Roller-System-For-Table-Saws/G1317, you will have to move the power control box. I needed my control box to be on the right side so I moved it down and over and patched the old retangle hole with a block of wood from the inside.

If I ever get around to creating a good solution for dust collection on the blade for this particular saw I will let you know and post some pictures.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com

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ScottKaye

312 posts in 706 days


#10 posted 02-09-2013 10:37 PM

thanks for the pics.. Have you tried any overarm solutions?

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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ScottKaye

312 posts in 706 days


#11 posted 02-24-2013 03:58 AM

Thebirdman..

Heres a dumb question, How did you make the 6” diameter cut in your Uni for the dust collection? It just occured to me that I have no idea how to get a clean circle cut in sheet metal! I like your placement on the side of the seam, Ive seen another photo somewhere on here where the hole was placed in the middle of the seam. Im no engineer, but wouldnt that weaken the integrity of the box?

Scott

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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TheBirdMan

21 posts in 1157 days


#12 posted 02-24-2013 05:03 PM

Scott, you are correct NEVER CUT ACROSS THE SEAM OF THE CABINET! The biggest reason to move the control box for this type of outfeed table is so that the box can fit between the mounting rails of the table. NOTE: if you plan to do this, remove the control box. Next drill all the holes/slots for the outfeed table & loosely attach the rails then mark the holes you need to drill for your control & motor cables. On my older style outfeed table you also have to make sure you have room for adjusting the rails up & down so make sure you take this into account before you drill the holes for the control box. You could also drill/cut slots for attaching your control box so this could also be adjusted up & down slightly. This way everything will fit the first time you assemble everything.

For the 6” dust exaust hole I used a Compass to draw the circle size needed. I then drilled a 1/2” hole close to the line and used a Jigsaw with a metal blade to cut it out. Lastly I file off the sharp edges.

-- -- Pat, Colorado; www.birdmanusa.com

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