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Do I need a Jointer Plane?

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Forum topic by 12strings posted 12-16-2011 04:45 PM 6688 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


12-16-2011 04:45 PM

I am a woodworker on a very small budget, and would like to spend my birthday money on a Larger plane to use as a jointer. I will be looking to spend no more than $100, so I’m looking at old stanleys. So Here’s my question:

Do I really need a No.7 or No.8? Or will a No. 6 Work almost as well?

There is a local antique market where I got a nice No.5 that I’m really happy with…they also have a No.6 Corrugated bottom that is pretty nice.

If I am preping small stock (for door frames, small tables, occasionally jointing edges) Can I get by using the No. 5 first, then the No. 6 for flattening, then a smoother?

O should I hold out and buy a No.7 or make a larger wooden jointer plane?

Thanks?

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!


33 replies so far

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4151 posts in 2413 days


#1 posted 12-16-2011 04:54 PM

My guess is that a #7 would be a good fit and I see them on ebay go for much under #100. I have a #6 and an #8 and I generally break out my #8 for jointing, but man is that thing heavy.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Chris

1879 posts in 3453 days


#2 posted 12-16-2011 05:55 PM

My #5 is the most used plane in my arsenal. Having said that, here is what I normally do when prepping stock by hand.

1. With a cambered blade in my #5 I flatten across the grain checking for high spots created by cupping, twisting etc…

2. Using my old pre-lateral #8 I will take smoothing passes across the grain this finishes leveling the cross width

3. Use the #8 with the grain

4. Use a smoother with the grain.

I believe that a #5 or #6 along with a smoother can provide you the functionality you are looking for initially. It is nice to have multiple planes and blades setup to do the job as it can save you a bit of time.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

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Dan

3630 posts in 2342 days


#3 posted 12-16-2011 06:04 PM

I would hold out and get a #7. The 6 may work fine but if it was me I would start with the #7.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1817 days


#4 posted 12-16-2011 07:30 PM

To those of us who don’t have stanley numbered planes… I have no clue if you’re talking about the 18” jack, the 22” jointer or the 28” jointer….

What I can say though, in non-numbered speak :P Is that with jointing, the longer your (sole) or fence, the straighter the joint is. I’ve used my 18” jack on some 12’ hickory before and it took a bit more work than it would have with a 22” or even 48” jointer.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#5 posted 12-16-2011 07:37 PM

The no. 7 is the one to get. No. 8 planes are real heavy.

You can make your own jointer plane easily enough. Once
you make a couple of planes you’ll think of it as an easy thing
to do.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2155 days


#6 posted 12-16-2011 08:27 PM

I’ve got all of them and I probably prefer the #7 for 4/4 stock (what I generally use). The #8 will get things very flat but like Loren mentions, it’s very big and has a bit of a technique learning curve. It’s fairly easy to tip the plane. If you like the wide #6, though, you might actually prefer the #8. If I could only have 1 plane, it would probably be the #7.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#7 posted 12-16-2011 09:00 PM

I have actually made one wooden plane already, It works well enough to be a scrub plane or fore plane. I’m not really adept at setting the iron with a mallet yet, so I have trouble getting the exact depth of cut that I want, but I would definitely be willing to try again. I’m thinking of making one of beech or Cherry, or whatever else Menards has. Any suggestions?

I Just through I’d get this No.6 Stanley for $35 if I thought it would work nearly as well.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2155 days


#8 posted 12-16-2011 09:03 PM

^The #6 is tippy to me but it should handle most projects.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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12strings

434 posts in 1846 days


#9 posted 12-16-2011 09:07 PM

Also, for you non-stanley guys, the #6 is 18’, #7 is 22’ & #8 is 24”.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View drfunk's profile

drfunk

223 posts in 2139 days


#10 posted 12-16-2011 09:07 PM

I’m going to buck the trend here and say the 6 will work fine – especially if you are already working with dimensional lumber and small stock. If you are working rough cut lumber or especially long pieces then a 7 or 8 (or longer) makes sense. IMO even a 5 – if set up properly – makes a fine jointer on small stock. Since I only occasionally work with non-dimensional lumber I usually have my 5 set up like a jointer and the 7 & 8 rarely come out of their climate controlled hyperbaric chamber.

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

224 posts in 2031 days


#11 posted 12-16-2011 09:14 PM

I would go for a No.7. The 8 is long and heavy, You need a big bench to use it and somewhere to store it. No 7.

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wingate_52

224 posts in 2031 days


#12 posted 12-16-2011 09:15 PM

My Record no.7 with the end on.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17960 posts in 2029 days


#13 posted 12-16-2011 09:37 PM

A 6 would work,especially if you’re doing shorter work. That said, for gluing up panels I always grab my 8. I like the fact that its heavy. I have a 7 and would certainly use it more if I didn’t have the 8.

In theory, your 5 would work if you don’t have a camber on your blade. You just need to pay more attention to detail with a shorter plane. If you really want a plane for jointing, you really should get a #7 though. You won’t regret it and should be able to pick one up under $100 easily. I’ve bought 2 #7s, one for $35, and one for $45, one on ebay and one locally. Be patient and look, you should be able to get one under $50 that would need minimal restoring.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Brandon

4151 posts in 2413 days


#14 posted 12-16-2011 09:39 PM

Perhaps the question is which plane should you get next, because I’m sure you’ll eventually want all of the numbers. If you can get a decent #6 for $35, I’d say go for it. You can even probably find a #7 that needs a good cleaning for the remainder of your $100.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View drfunk's profile

drfunk

223 posts in 2139 days


#15 posted 12-16-2011 09:47 PM

Remember, a number 6 is only a short Chris Schwarz blog post away from being the best and most sought after plane in all the universe. (same with all the other planes he posts about)

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