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Forum topic by redrdrnr posted 12-16-2011 12:30 AM 1476 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


12-16-2011 12:30 AM

the company i work for just got its first thermo treating kiln. we are also
a large hardwood sawmill/flooring operation in west tennessee. we are
primaily cooking hardwoods.

i manage that part of the company and will be happy to help anyone
who has a interest in thermo treated hardwoods.

i just got thru covering my patio deck with sap gum.


11 replies so far

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#1 posted 12-16-2011 01:02 AM

there are only 5 or 6 kilns in the u.s. they are stainless steel and
heat the wood to 400 deg. f. they create a thermo chemical reaction.

poplar comes out looking like black walnut and its ability to absorb
mositure has been reduced by up to 90%,(based on how high temp
is and for how long)

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SASmith

1850 posts in 2449 days


#2 posted 12-16-2011 02:14 AM

I have read that cooked maple is very brittle. Do you find that is the case with your setup?

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#3 posted 12-16-2011 03:14 AM

thermo treating makes any wood harder and also more brittle.
instead of using 15 ga flooring nails, you should use 18 ga.

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jerkylips

273 posts in 2032 days


#4 posted 12-16-2011 03:34 AM

I remember reading about a process that could replace pressure treating, without the harsh chemicals. Is that what this is? If so, safe to assume it’s primarily for outdoor use?

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Howie

2656 posts in 2385 days


#5 posted 12-16-2011 03:57 AM

Wasn’t this originally done by the Swedes? How does it compare cost wise?

-- Life is good.

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#6 posted 12-16-2011 04:58 AM

the lumber is heated while the chamber is slightly pressuized and water injected. at that
temp you must displace o2 or charring will occur. the cool thing about the finished product
is that the wood sugars are crystalized making the woods ability to absorb moisture reduced
by up to 90%. the wood is very stable.

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#7 posted 12-16-2011 05:03 AM

finland is the main exporter of kilns that i know of. jar-tek has
a good but expensive design. pricing is bascally add $1.10 to
the regular price of hardwood flooring. i understand that prices
are all over the place.

View JimDaddyO's profile

JimDaddyO

442 posts in 2541 days


#8 posted 12-16-2011 12:52 PM

I have just been reading a bit on this in a guitar forum. It seems the process does a good job of making the wood more stable, which is a plus for a stringed instrument.

-- my blog: http://watertoneworkshop.blogspot.ca/ my You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA?view_as=subscriber

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#9 posted 12-16-2011 06:09 PM

Is this process the same as Torrefying? If not, how are they different?

I’m very interested.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#10 posted 12-16-2011 08:22 PM

Torrification happens at a higher temp, I believe 600
Deg. It actually consumes the lignien and pretty much
leaves carbon.

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redrdrnr

7 posts in 1816 days


#11 posted 12-16-2011 08:23 PM

If I can figure out how to send photos, I,ll
send some

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