LumberJocks

Cutting Board Question #2

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by MashMaster posted 12-12-2011 05:01 AM 1415 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MashMaster's profile

MashMaster

92 posts in 1318 days


12-12-2011 05:01 AM

I have been doing a few cutting boards and noticed that the mineral oil (usp) turns the work darker than I thought it would. Maple comes out like a light caramel color. I saw the boards to 400 grit first. The other boards I see here seem to be a brighter color than mine.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX


11 replies so far

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2914 posts in 2554 days


#1 posted 12-12-2011 05:05 AM

I don’t like mineral oil for just that reason, the boards always seem darker. I’ll be interested to see if anyone has an explanation for that. Personally I use walnut oil and have always enjoyed the look.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View MashMaster's profile

MashMaster

92 posts in 1318 days


#2 posted 12-12-2011 05:06 AM

I’d use that but my wife is allergic to nuts.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1709 days


#3 posted 12-12-2011 06:00 AM

Make sure to also stay away from tung oil then too.

The thing I’ve noticed when using Salad Bowl Finish for a board is that with time, the SBF wears off. You then have to decide if you want to lightly sand it, then re-apply more SBF and wait several days for it to cure before using the board again, or simply begin using mineral oil to reseal the board. With this approach though, the board will darken where it’s used the most, as that’s where the mineral oil will be most readily absorbed.

You could use something that is more beeswax or carnauba wax-based and that will likely help with the color issue, but will not provide as much “deep” protection for the board as a saturated/near-saturated mineral oil finish.

I don’t have any explanation on the color difference when using mineral oil, but am curious to hear why that happens.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5306 posts in 1257 days


#4 posted 12-12-2011 06:45 AM

The darker color should be the same look as if the board was wet with water or any other clear liquid. The oil penetrates for protection, but leaves the board with a “wet” look. If it is an end grain board, even more oil will penetrate, giving an even darker color than face grain boards. I guess the color change is subjective, I tend to like it better with oil, it seems richer/deeper. I am unaware of a way around it, buy there may be one.

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

704 posts in 1160 days


#5 posted 12-12-2011 12:48 PM

Degoose posted a while ago that he uses grape seed oil. If he doesn’t reply to this blog, perhaps send him a pm to ask what effect that has on the wood.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View WillieIV's profile

WillieIV

11 posts in 1016 days


#6 posted 12-12-2011 05:45 PM

Sure wish the “shine” would stay with a board that only has mineral oil applied. They look so nice once finished and before you actually use them!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1709 days


#7 posted 12-12-2011 08:35 PM

@WillieIV, a topcoat of beeswax (or a combo topcoat with beeswax in it) will help maintain the shine, and help repel water too. I know you said “only has mineral oil applied,” but I thought I’d throw it out there.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 12-13-2011 12:50 AM

I use Howards Butcher Block Conditioner, once it dries it has a bit of shine to it. It is mineral oil and natural waxes mixed together.
Another tip for shine….
Sand the board to 200 grit, spritz the board with water to raise the grain, then sand again to 220.
When you apply finish to grain that is unraised, the grain raises with the finish and gives a dull appearance.
Try it, I think you will see a difference.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1709 days


#9 posted 12-13-2011 03:14 AM

I have also used the butcher block conditioner that Lisa mentioned for recoating. Seems to work fairly well. It’s more mineral oil than beeswax, as it’s a thick liquid at room temperature.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11493 posts in 1764 days


#10 posted 12-13-2011 05:41 AM

I use Behandla from Ikea for anything that touches food. It is clear when applied to maple. It takes 24 hours before you can recoat. Mineral oil will be faster!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View MashMaster's profile

MashMaster

92 posts in 1318 days


#11 posted 12-13-2011 06:03 AM

warning “Behandla” has tung oil in it, so nut allergic people may react

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase