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Problems with skewed rabbet

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Forum topic by Dave posted 12-08-2011 10:28 PM 1501 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


12-08-2011 10:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: skewed plane

Guys I am having problems getting constant results with my wooden skewed rabbet planes. I am getting stair steps up the wall of the rabbet or my bottom is not flat. Any techniques or tips to the operation of the idiot behind the plane?
I have a one inch skewed and a skewed jack with knickers.
I think it is the setup or position of the iron.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com


19 replies so far

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

3457 posts in 2618 days


#1 posted 12-08-2011 10:35 PM

I use a minimum setting on the blade. Is your blade square with the sole? Make it easier to cut and don’t have any tear out issues. I’d rather take a bit more time than have to deal with planing probs.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1773 days


#2 posted 12-08-2011 10:50 PM

I´m sure I have the right R/c control for the shovel behind the stearing wheel
but I´m not sure it will help you here :-)

it doesn´t matter if its a rabbetplane or a shuolder plane you need to handle it
correct … yes .. :-) and you have to set the iron fluss with the site or a thou out to the side that will
run along the wall of the rabbet if not you will get stairs
and the plane need to be plomp and level when you make shaves

Dennis

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1351 days


#3 posted 12-08-2011 10:57 PM

When my rebates go bad, it’s usually a nicker problem for me. It’s not very galoot, but sometimes I’ll pre-score the rebate before planing. Once I get down about 1/8 inch or so, I’ll score again. The nice thing about it is that when you’re done, you can deny you did this;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#4 posted 12-08-2011 11:50 PM

Bill will set for a minimal pass and check for squareness.
Dennis what you are saying Is it needs to be flush and square with the side and bottom of plane?
Bertha you made me laugh thanks much needed today.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9925 posts in 1276 days


#5 posted 12-09-2011 12:03 AM

Buy a #79 to clean them up, perhaps?

heh heh heh

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#6 posted 12-09-2011 12:26 AM

Oh Smitty that was wrong. Heck I got a table saw. Wheres the fun in that.
New tool, new set of skills to operate the blasted thing.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 12-09-2011 12:34 AM

cr1 throat opening is not adjustable. I can only make it larger and that’s permanent.
But depth of cut and squareness looks to be a lot of my problems.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7571 posts in 2306 days


#8 posted 12-09-2011 12:53 AM

They are really a pain to get right. Your setup of the plane has to be
within tolerances that are hard to describe, your workpiece has to
be held right, and your technique has to be correct. The grain direction
can make you a bit crazy too.

I found during the period when I fussed a lot with trying to do this
stuff with planes I found that I could hack out the rabbet roughly
with the rabbet plane and then I would use a pair of L-N side rabbet
planes to clean up the mess I made.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 12-09-2011 01:32 AM

Loren thank you. Its the setup and technique that has me baffled. Like do you sharpen the side of the iron? If so what does that do to the placement of the blade?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2925 posts in 1145 days


#10 posted 12-09-2011 02:21 AM

Sorry…. I mis-read the title…. I thought we were going to have a recipe for a bunny in a pot.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Loren

7571 posts in 2306 days


#11 posted 12-09-2011 02:26 AM

Well, I sold my 289 and no. 46 so I’m out of the business of fussing
with skew rabbet planes, but as I recall you want the corner of the iron
protrubing out the side by maybe 1/64-128th of an inch. Just a hair.
Then, if you’re using the nickers, you want them set just a tad deeper
than the blade and you want the corner of that angled iron to split
the line the nicker carves… as I recall. Garrett Hack’s book on hand
planes may have some advice on setting up skew rabbet planes.

You also have to set the iron so it is parallel to the face of the plane,
and that means a real attentive approach to grinding and honing
because the amount of play in the angles you can get away with
that keep the edge parallel and the corner sticking out just right
is minimal – maybe 1 degree each way or something. If some bozo
messed up the angle before you got the plane, you’ll have to
regrind the iron to the proper angle.

You don’t cut the shoulder with the side of the plane, you cut
it with that acute angle on the corner of the iron. You do
however need to use the edge of the plane to register the cut
as you deepen the rabbet, and there’s a feeling of pushing the
corner of the iron into the shoulder sideways. Add to that
you have to keep the sole close to parallel to the face of the
board and apply enough downward pressure consistently to
take a cut of uniform depth.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1773 days


#12 posted 12-09-2011 02:51 AM

Loren said it much much better than I can :-)
its a pain in the A… to set skewed plane up but its not a dado plane so
you don´t need the spurs to score with unless you want to make a rabbet a cross some panels
and then you are better with a fillister in your hands

Dennis

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#13 posted 12-09-2011 03:34 AM

Dallas now that was down right funny.
Loren thank you. Thats the kind of information that I was looking for. Thanks for the book, I will give it a read.
Dennis I know its a pain that’s why I asked you guys for help. It’s a skill set that I would like to learn.
If I master the skew then the fillister will be a brease to use.
Thank you guys for your input.
rabbit fer dinner anyone?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1773 days


#14 posted 12-09-2011 02:02 PM

Dave you can benefit from adding a board were the edge is jointet flat
and use it as a fence to hold your skew plump and straight on the line
just like if you wuold make a dado with your shoulderplane in the mittle of a panel

Dennis

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1351 days


#15 posted 12-09-2011 03:01 PM

Loren, those are two planes on my short list.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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