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Forum topic by borderkid posted 12-07-2011 05:33 PM 979 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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borderkid

1 post in 2718 days


12-07-2011 05:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tools

I recently bought a 9 inch bandsaw at a garage sale and was wondering if the tension on the blade should be released when not in use. It is a ryobi model; I did download the manual for it but could not find any reference to this issue, any help is appreciated…


11 replies so far

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2394 days


#1 posted 12-07-2011 05:37 PM

It is good practice to release the tension when it is not in use. I do it every time I leave the shop for the day.

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ShaneA

6471 posts in 2058 days


#2 posted 12-07-2011 05:50 PM

I am with Chuck, release when not in use, good luck.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3420 days


#3 posted 12-07-2011 06:10 PM

I also have a note that I place on the BS reminding me that the blade is LOOSE.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2534 days


#4 posted 12-07-2011 07:04 PM

In general, it is always a good idea to release tension when the BS is not in use. I try to remember to release tension at the end of any day that I used the BS.

I think this is very important if you are using conventional rubber tires.

It is a little less critical if you switch urethane tires.

However, in addition to the strain on the tires, the springs will loose some of their strength more quickly if you leave the tension on.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2152 days


#5 posted 12-07-2011 07:35 PM

I’ve heard that it’s a good idea. Truth is, I’ve never released the tension in any saw I’ve ever owned. I’ve never noticed a kinked blade, egged tire, or failed springs. The jury’s still out for me.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2457 days


#6 posted 12-07-2011 08:18 PM

I have never released the tension on mine either. No problems with it and it has been like that for a few years. The only time mine is without tension is when I am changing blades.

Now, it might be a bigger problem with a small saw. It is much easier to put a higher tension on a small saw than it is a large one.

That said, I see no compelling reason to not do it. I just don’t because I am lazy and once I get it all aligned and tracking well, I don’t want to move anything if I don’t have to.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Viking's profile

Viking

878 posts in 2654 days


#7 posted 12-07-2011 08:27 PM

I am also a believer that tension should be released after use of a BS. This does bring up an interesting safety question. How do we all remember to re-tension before powering up our bandsaws?

I do remember a post where one of our brother LJ’s had a “re-tension” reminder tag that hangs in front of the power switch. Don’t remember who or when though.

Good luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2152 days


#8 posted 12-07-2011 08:49 PM

^Aha, Viking! Behold the reason I don’t detension mine. I’ve had two blades come screaming out of my saw. One was a 1 inch carbide. If my cabinet wasn’t heavy metal, I don’t know what would have happened. As it were, it sounded like something out of Dante’s Inferno. I made a pointless attempt to step on the brake, risking myself further due to reflex. Until I spring for a gigantic gaudy bright red detensioning lever, I’d rather leave the tension on.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Viking

878 posts in 2654 days


#9 posted 12-07-2011 09:08 PM

Al;

Understood. With your big machine the 1” blade would probably chase you down the street!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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Viking

878 posts in 2654 days


#10 posted 12-07-2011 09:11 PM

Found it.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1650

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 2729 days


#11 posted 12-07-2011 09:37 PM

I’m with Bertha on this one. I have not ever de-tensioned a blade and have had only 2 bandsaws during my 20+ years of doing this hobby. The one I replaced was only due to wanting to increase the capacity…and the horsepower so that it could adequately cut through really hard woods. I have seen the pros and cons of de-tensioning….both have their merits….and both have their dangers….to me de-tensioning is more of a problem…especially with the increasing “senior” moments that I have been experiencing over the years….nothing worse then cranking up a de-tensioned blade and the slap on the forehead moment where you realize this…and how dangerous this can be.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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