LumberJocks

routing ogee on end of board

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by fredf posted 12-04-2011 05:23 AM 1062 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2454 days


12-04-2011 05:23 AM

I am doing some windowsills and need to route an ogee on the two ends and a side, the side isn’t a problem but am wondering if I could use a tenon jig to do the ends, of if this would be too much like running the work between the fence and the bit?? I do think that I would remove the bearing for safety’s sake.

any thoughts? or am I overly paranoid????

fred

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma


4 replies so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1221 posts in 1368 days


#1 posted 12-04-2011 06:19 AM

Fred what you need is a sled. The cut you are making is called a cope cut. It needs to be 90 degrees to the side. Coping sleds are easy to make and they are sold where ever routers and bits are sold.

The long piece is the work. The one above it is the clamping block. The piece below is the sacrificial backup that keeps the end from blowing out. I just build a square frame and added sandpaper to the clamping block. Then it rides the router table fence nice and square…..and safe.
Hope this helps

Jack

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2454 days


#2 posted 12-04-2011 06:42 AM

jumbojack
Thanks for the reminder! That was the reminder I needed. I just remembered how I did it the last time! Sheesh, a bad winter with lots of ice, followed by a T4 tornado followed by an earthquake, followed by a major tropical storm. (we have had very crazy weather this year!!!!) The weather must have affected my memory somehow!!!

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1221 posts in 1368 days


#3 posted 12-05-2011 12:26 AM

Geez Fred. Here in the Sacramento valley bad weather is rare. We complain when it gets below 40 or the wind is above 40. I have not felt an earthquake for over 30 years. Glad I was able to jog the ole neurons.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1113 days


#4 posted 12-05-2011 02:10 AM

It also works to use a good size piece of scrap ply or MDF with straight edges and at least one true 90deg corner to use behind your work piece. Hold them tight together and against the fence and the scrap will support the work piece and prevent blowout.

Not as nice as Jack’s sled, but works for an occasional cut.

-- John

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase